Games Beaten 2022

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ElkinFencer10
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Re: Games Beaten 2022

Post by ElkinFencer10 »

Games Beaten in 2021 - 32
* denotes a replay

January (20 Games Beaten)
1. Project MIKHAIL: A Muv-Luv War Story - Steam - January 1
2. Shin Megami Tensei V - Switch - January 9
3. Halo 2600 - Atari 2600 - January 10
4. Cruis'n Blast - Switch - January 13
5. Alan Wake - PlayStation 5 - January 15
6. Alan Wake's American Nightmare - Xbox 360 - January 15
7. Apsulov: End of Gods - Playstation 5 - January 16
8. Captain U - Wii U - January 16
9. Raji: An Ancient Epic - Xbox One - January 17
10. JankBrain - Switch - January 22
11. Would You Like to Run an Idol Café - Switch - January 22
12. Bury Me, My Love - Switch - January 22
13. A Normal Lost Phone - Switch - January 22
14. Another Lost Phone: Laura's Story - Switch - January 22
15. Cthulhu Saves Christmas - Switch - January 23
16. Armed 7 - Dreamcast - January 24
17. Satazius Next - Dreamcast - January 24
18. Wolflame - Dreamcast - January 25
19. Metal Slug 1st Mission - Neo Geo Pocket - January 25
20. Metal Slug 2nd Mission - Neo Geo Pocket - January 26


February (1 Games Beaten)
21. Pokemon Legends: Arceus - Switch - February 5


March (0 Games Beaten)
wow I suck ass lmao


April (3 Games Beaten)
22. The Last of Us Part II - PlayStation 4 - April 9
23. Metro 2033 Redux - PlayStation 4 - April 14
24. Sakura Angels - Switch - April 26


May (3 Games Beaten)
25. The Legend of Zelda: Four Swords Adventures - Gamecube - May 8
26. Metro Last Light Redux - PlayStation 4 - May 14
27. Metro Exodus - Series X - May 28


June (5 Games Beaten)
28. Cyberpunk 2077 - Series X - June 11
29. Sniper Elite 5 - Series X - June 12
30. The Infectious Madness of Doctor Dekker - PlayStation 4 - June 15
31. Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Shredder's Revenge - Xbox One - June 16
32. 007 Legends - Wii U - June 17


32. 007 Legends - Wii U - June 17

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When I was taking a nap the other day, I had a dream about the canceled Goldeneye remaster for Xbox 360. I woke up and thought, "Wow, I wish I could play that on my Xbox. The Goldeneye remake on Wii was just too different. Hey, I've got that one 007 game on my Wii U! I'll play that! It's the next best thing, right?" Well God, I hope it's not the next best thing; if it is, I'd hate to see the worst thing. I played on Wii U, but these screenshots are from the PlayStation 3 version.

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007 Legends is intended to be a sort of "best of" James Bond game. Instead of focusing on retelling the story of one specific movie like most of the series, Legends goes through very brief retellings of five James Bond movies (six if you buy the DLC or play on Wii U) - Goldfinger, On Her Majesty's Secret Service, Moonraker, License to Kill, Die Another Day, and Skyfall. There are some pros and some cons of this approach. On the one hand, you can get some bite-sized adventures that provide you with the some action and the Spark Notes version of the story, and the varying villains and settings keep the game from getting stale. On the other hand, each mission is over too quickly to really get invested in the story, and it can end up feeling like a quick cash-in; why bother giving a good retelling of one story when you can give a bullet point version of several?

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Unfortunately, discussion of the game's positive elements is kind of moot because the game is complete rubbish. First, let's talk about the visuals. They're not great. I know the Wii U isn't a power house console, and the game itself was just a ported 360 game, but even for the Xbox 360, this is not a particularly impressive looking game. The character models look very plain, the weapons look bland, and the environments look like they're from a PS2 game and just upscaled. That's not even what makes the game bad, though; there are plenty of games that are graphically lackluster but a ton of fun to play. What truly ruins this game is the controls. There's no option to tweak vertical and horizontal sensitivity separately, and the camera seems to move along the two axes at a 2:1 speed ratio. It seems to me that I should be able to move my cursor to the left about as quickly as I should be able to move it up, but that's not even close to the case here. Not only that, but it's not a smooth feeling movement; it's jerky and horrendously difficult to aim. Fortunately, the ADS target snap-on works pretty well, so you can play by relying on that and aim assist, but you shouldn't have to rely on that to play an FPS game.

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I've played some games with janky controls, but 007 Legends might take the cake. Goldeneye's controls didn't feel quite this bad, and that controller only had one analog stick. Call of Duy on NGage didn't feel any worse, and that's a literal early 2000s cell phone. 007 Legends is playable thanks to the snap-on aiming, but it's genuinely terrible. It's not even "so bad it's good." It's just bad. I don't recommend this game for anyone.
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prfsnl_gmr
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Re: Games Beaten 2022

Post by prfsnl_gmr »

Awesome reviews, Elk. As a fan of classic James Bond films, I wish 007 Legends had been a better gam.

Also, with Pidge and Elk posting again, it looks like our local game destroyers have returned. I’ll have to step up if I want to keep up!

…..


First 40
1. Space Warrior (Switch)
2. Itta (Switch)
3. Shaq Fu: A Legend Reborn (Switch)
4. Mask of Mists (Switch)
5. Metagal (Switch)
6. Foxyland 2 (Switch)
7. Submerged (Switch)
8. Back to Bed (Switch)
9. Thoth (Switch)
10. 140 (Switch)
11. Infinite: Beyond the Mind (Switch)
12. Ninja Striker (Switch)
13. Kid Tripp (Switch)
14. Miles & Kilo (Switch)
15. Neon Junctions (Switch)
16. Golf Zero (Switch)
17. 198X (Switch)
18. Macbat 64 (Switch)
19. Kiwi 64 (Switch)
20. Toree 3D (Switch)
21. Toree 2 (Switch)
22. #RaceDieRun (Switch)
23. Micetopia (Switch)
24. Tomena Sanner (Wii)
25. Contra ReBirth (Wii)
26. Unstrong Legacy (Switch)
27. Quarantine Circular (Switch)
28. Infernax (Switch)
29. Cosmos Bit (Switch)
30. Ape Out (Switch)
31. Return of the Double Dragon (Super Famicom)
32. Contra (Famicom)
33. Summer Carnival ‘92 RECCA (Famicom)
34. Bionic Commando (Arcade)
35. Shinobi (Arcade)
36. Super Meat Boy (Switch)
37. Chex Quest HD (Switch)
38. King’s Field II (PSX)
39. Mechstermination Force (Switch)
40. Swords and Bones (Switch)

41. The Solitaire Conspiracy (Switch)
42. Super Cyborg (Switch)
43. Blazing Chrome (Switch)
44. Son Wukong v. Robot (Switch)
45. King’s Field III: Pilot Style (PS1)

King’s Field III: Pilot Style is a demo/prologue to King’s Field III that was released exclusively as a promotional CD at a Japanese gaming show. So, to say it is an obscure game is a bit of an understatement. Still, the incredibly dedicated King’s Field fan base located and dumped a copy of the game, and, later, released a complete fan translation, making the game available and playable to almost everyone.

As, basically, a demo, King’s Field III: Pilot Style can be beaten in about an hour. As, basically, a demo, however, there are no save points either; so, the game might take substantially longer than that if you aren’t familiar with the series’ uniquely archaic mechanics. (PRO-TIP: Don’t attempt the platforming section on anything but an emulator unless you want to play the first half of the demo a half dozen times.) The game consists of, basically, a small open world and a small dungeon, with a boss fight at the end, bookended by 1990s CGI FMV sequences. It plays like other King’s Field games. That is, it’s a pretty engaging first-person ARPG with wonky controls. The frame rate is a lot smoother than it is in previous games in the series, however, and the game contains some other QoL features and technical improvements that have me excited for King’s Field III.

If you haven’t played any of From Software’s other first-person ARPGs, King’s Field III: Pilot Style is probably a good place to start. I certainly enjoyed it, and I recommend it to anyone potentially interested in the series.
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Re: Games Beaten 2022

Post by BoneSnapDeez »

prfsnl_gmr wrote:Don’t attempt the platforming section on anything but an emulator unless you want to play the first half of the demo a half dozen times.


Those games have platforming?? :shock:
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Re: Games Beaten 2022

Post by Note »

I thought the same thing, Bone!

After all the positive remarks about the King's Field games from prfsnl, I'm really interested in trying them out! Would love to get one of the games later this year to give the series a try.
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Re: Games Beaten 2022

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Markies' Games Beat List Of 2022!
*Denotes Replay For Completion*

1. Final Fantasy X/X-2 HD Remaster (PS3)
2. Max Payne 2: The Fall Of Max Payne (XBOX)
3. Streets of Rage 4 (NS)
4. The Legend Of Zelda: Ocarina Of Time Master Quest (GCN)
5. Dirge Of Cerberus: Final Fantasy VII (PS2)
6. Darkstalkers (PS1)
7. Evolution: The World Of Sacred Device (SDC)
8. Ogre Battle 64: Person Of Lordly Calibur (N64)
9. Draogn Quest VI (SNES)
10. Batman: The Video Game (GEN)
11. Mike Tyson's Punch-Out!! (NES)
12. Mario Kart: Super Circuit (GBA)
13. Pokemon Red (GB)
14. Wii Sports (Wii)
15. Splatoon (WiiU)

16. Jak & Daxter: The Precursor Legacy (PS2)

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I completed Jak & Daxter: The Precursor Legacy on the Sony Playstation 2 this evening!

I don't know why, but I have a weird fascination of getting a PS2 game for every letter in the alphabet. Maybe it is because I own so many that it seemed like a pretty reasonable goal. Because I am normally swimming in PS2 games for many years, it wasn't a goal that I was actively looking to achieve. But, when I beat my Backlog, I could now buy PS2 games again and I knew that I had to make another step towards that goal. I needed a 'J' game, so Jak & Daxter quickly shot onto my list. Right before I went game shopping, I went to my yearly Board Game Convention and in their flea market, a guy was selling Jak & Daxter along with Ratchet 2 for very cheap. Deciding to get a jump on my gaming spree, I decided to make the purchase and wanting a quick PS2 game to play, I decided to pop it in.

Maybe it is because I always associate Jak & Daxter with Ratchet & Clank, but I was kind of shocked to find that Jak & Daxter is a straight platformer. In fact, it seems like it would fit perfectly in the Banjo-Kazooie line of games. Most of the game is running, jumping and doing some exploration with some very light action elements strewn throughout the game. It does not have a hub world like in Mario 64 as everything is interconnected and all of the doo-hickeys that you need to collect are all out there in the open. The game quickly became addicting as it is very easy to stumble on what you are looking for which leads you to the next one and so on. Before I knew it, I had collected everything in the game and I was over 50% of the way through it. The controls are extremely tight and I never had any major frustrations with them or the camera. The platforming is done extremely well, which is impressive considering its a 3-D one and I am normally not good at them. Also, the difficulty ramps up at just the right pace as it is not until really late in the game that it begins to get frustrating. But, death has little penalty and you start up almost immediately.

Overall, I really enjoyed my time with Jak & Daxter. My biggest complaint would be that Daxter can get a bit annoying, especially near the end. But, he is in the game surprisingly little, so its not that bad. I usually get very frustrated with platformers, but I really enjoyed this one. If you want a fun and easy collect-a-thon platformer that is not crazy or hard, this is a great one!
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Re: Games Beaten 2022

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Games Beaten in 2021 - 33
* denotes a replay

January (20 Games Beaten)
1. Project MIKHAIL: A Muv-Luv War Story - Steam - January 1
2. Shin Megami Tensei V - Switch - January 9
3. Halo 2600 - Atari 2600 - January 10
4. Cruis'n Blast - Switch - January 13
5. Alan Wake - PlayStation 5 - January 15
6. Alan Wake's American Nightmare - Xbox 360 - January 15
7. Apsulov: End of Gods - Playstation 5 - January 16
8. Captain U - Wii U - January 16
9. Raji: An Ancient Epic - Xbox One - January 17
10. JankBrain - Switch - January 22
11. Would You Like to Run an Idol Café - Switch - January 22
12. Bury Me, My Love - Switch - January 22
13. A Normal Lost Phone - Switch - January 22
14. Another Lost Phone: Laura's Story - Switch - January 22
15. Cthulhu Saves Christmas - Switch - January 23
16. Armed 7 - Dreamcast - January 24
17. Satazius Next - Dreamcast - January 24
18. Wolflame - Dreamcast - January 25
19. Metal Slug 1st Mission - Neo Geo Pocket - January 25
20. Metal Slug 2nd Mission - Neo Geo Pocket - January 26


February (1 Games Beaten)
21. Pokemon Legends: Arceus - Switch - February 5


March (0 Games Beaten)
wow I suck ass lmao


April (3 Games Beaten)
22. The Last of Us Part II - PlayStation 4 - April 9
23. Metro 2033 Redux - PlayStation 4 - April 14
24. Sakura Angels - Switch - April 26


May (3 Games Beaten)
25. The Legend of Zelda: Four Swords Adventures - Gamecube - May 8
26. Metro Last Light Redux - PlayStation 4 - May 14
27. Metro Exodus - Series X - May 28


June (6 Games Beaten)
28. Cyberpunk 2077 - Series X - June 11
29. Sniper Elite 5 - Series X - June 12
30. The Infectious Madness of Doctor Dekker - PlayStation 4 - June 15
31. Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Shredder's Revenge - Xbox One - June 16
32. 007 Legends - Wii U - June 17
33. TimeSplitters 2 - Xbox - June 18


33. TimeSplitters 2 - Xbox - June 18

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TimeSplitters is the spiritual successor to the Rare-developed N64 FPS legends, Goldeneye 007 and Perfect Dark. Rare didn't make TimeSplitters, but a lot of the talent on the teams that made Goldeneye and Perfect Dark had gone to Free Radical and worked on TimeSplitters. I haven't played the first TimeSplitters, so I can't speak to how that one compares, but TimeSplitters 2 is very much Perfect Dark brought into the 21st Century. Forget Perfect Dark Zero (although I love that game), this is the true successor to the Perfect Dark legacy. These screenshots were captured via the Xbox Series X's backwards compatibility.

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The premise of TimeSplitters is that an alien race - the TimeSplitters - is hellbent on destroying the human race by going back in time and destroying us before we can resist, but a small group of 25th Century humans is holding out against the aliens, trying to gather the time crystals and thwart their dastardly plans. Honestly, TimeSplitters 2 doesn't really give you a whole lot of story. Each of the game's ten levels has you playing as a different character in a different period of time from the 19th Century's American Wild West to the 25th Century with contextual objectives to accomplish in addition to the "retrieve the time crystal" and "escape through the time portal" objectives that are in every level.

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This is a truly great game, but the story isn't really here. So what makes it so good? The gameplay. The gameplay is phenomenal. It takes everything that made Goldeneye and Perfect Dark amazing and brought it into the 21st Century with better 3D visuals and dual analog controls. With that said, the controls aren't the best. Rather than holding the left trigger to aim - that's a convention that wouldn't become standard for a few years yet - you press a button to toggle an aim. It's also not aiming down the sights; it just puts a better crosshair on screen and a very slight zoom. The real problem with the aiming button is that the aim always returns to the center of the screen, but the right stick changes to control the crosshair, not the camera. So you're not moving the camera to put the crosshair over an enemy; you're controlling the crosshair on a static camera to put it over an enemy, and you have to hold the crosshair there actively while you shoot. In the end, I never used the aiming; I just relied on the Goldeneye-esque aim assist and hip fired the whole game. It worked great and was way less frustrating than "manual" aim.

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I haven't gotten to try this out yet because I don't have friends, but there's also a multiplayer mode in TimeSplitters 2. From what I've seen and can tell from fiddling on my own, it's basically the Goldeneye multiplayer but better looking and controlling. I mean, what else do you need? Goldeneye multiplayer is a fond memory of anyone who grew up with a Nintendo 64. TimeSplitters 2 may not be everyone a modern gamer wants from a shooter - it's 20 years old, after all - but for those of us who remember Goldeneye and Perfect Dark with nostalgia and just want something slightly more modernized and playable on a modern console (the Xbox version is playable on Series X), this is a pretty dang good solution.
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PartridgeSenpai
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Re: Games Beaten 2022

Post by PartridgeSenpai »

Partridge Senpai's 2021 Beaten Games:
Previously: 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
* indicates a repeat

1. Dandy Dungeon: The Legend of Brave Yamada (Switch)
2. Dandy Dungeon 2: The Phantom Bride (Switch)
3. Mon Amor (Switch)
4. Terraria (PC)
5. Puppeteer (PS3) *
6. Chocobo's Mystery Dungeon (PS1)
7. Project Altered Beast (PS2)
8. Devil Summoner II: Soul Hackers (Saturn)
9. Kirby Star Allies: Heroes in Another Dimension (Switch)
10. Kirby's Dream Land 2 (GB)
11. Tales of Vesperia (PS3) *
12. Art Style: BOXLIFE (DSi)
13. Super Robot Wars F (Saturn)
14. Super Robot Wars F Final (Saturn)
15. Super Robot Wars 64 (N64)
16. Knight Gundam Monogatari (SFC)
17. Knight Gundam Monogatari 2 (SFC)
18. Mega Man Legends 2 (PSP)
19. Mighty No. 9 (PC)

20. Mega Man Xtreme (GBC)

This was one of the last things on my list of yet unplayed Mega Man games, and so I set about finally getting to it. Given what I’d heard about how it controls, I really didn’t particularly want to play it on real hardware, so I ended up emulating the English version and playing it with an Xbone gamepad instead of playing a Japanese copy on real hardware. It took me about 4 hours to get the real ending with fairly light save state use.

Xtreme is effectively the handheld version of the first couple Mega Man X games, but it has handheld versions of a jumble of stages, and to get around the fact that story-wise this makes no sense, they make a story here based around going into a computer database to set right all of the memory data of past battles that are being corrupted by the bad guys. The story is ultimately fine, but it’s really not why we’re here, as is usual for the older MMX games (though this was actually made close to the year 2000, so closer to when MMX7 was released than 1 and 2, but just ignore that bit :b).

The gameplay is pretty straightforwardly handheld ports of half of Mega Man X 1 and 2. Technically you have 3 difficulty modes of Normal, Hard, and XTREME (because of course you do), but all that really changes is how many of the game’s 8 stages you do as well for whether or not you fight the real final boss (Normal is first 4 stages, Hard is 2nd 4, and Xtreme is all 4 + the real final boss at the end). Now there aren’t much in the way of new stages, but what is here are pretty darn competent versions of levels from X 1 and 2 (as well as a Sigma stage from each game). Some of the more technically difficult parts of them have been cut out or shortened down, but it’s still a really impressive version of those stages. The boss fights have been changed a bit too to work better with a smaller screen, and there are even just about all the bonus X parts from both X1 and 2 to find hidden more or less where they always were. The only real design complaint I have is that with only two buttons and a D-pad, you’re forced to use double-tap to dash, which is less than ideal in the harder wall climbing sections.

Graphically, this is a REALLY impressive looking GBC game, and it’s even more wild that it’s also a black-cart game that’d also work on a normal GB. Granted I don’t have an original GB to test it with, games like this *really* show off the differences in power between the GBC and its older brother and just the kind of stuff the little colorful 8-bit machine was capable of. The music is basically all 8-bit versions of tracks from the represented games. That’s a pretty tall order for the GBC’s sound chip, and it does its best. It’s hardly a substitute for the real thing, but it’s ultimately fine.

Verdict: Recommended. I thought this game would end up being a lot rougher than it actually is. Now sure, part of how much I enjoyed it may be down to the hardware and controller I played it with, but even still, this is a remarkably well put together game considering how rough the 8-bit portable version of the early MMX games would be expected to be. Well worth playing if you’re a Mega Man fan and looking to change things up a bit~.

----

21. Mega Man Xtreme 2 (GBC)

After completing Xtreme 1, I of course immediately fired up its sequel, as it was basically the last traditional-style Mega Man game I hadn’t yet beaten that I had any interest in playing. Now, this being a proper GBC-exclusive game, not a black cart game like its predecessor, I expected something at the very least a bit flashier, if not ultimately more of the same. While perhaps not quite what I expected, I certainly got something ambitious, that’s for sure ^^;. It took me about 6 hours to get the best ending with pretty gratuitous save state use, playing the English version on an emulator with an Xbone pad.

The story is once again more or less an excuse to remake a bunch of levels from X 1, 2, and 3, but with a bit more effort put into it this time. X, Zero, and confusingly enough, some crew from the later X games as well go to a mysterious island to learn who has been stealing reploids souls, and they end up having to do battle against the island’s strange inhabitants. It does its job just fine to set up the story as well as give the game excuses to have a lot more original levels and bosses that aren’t from any of the adapted games.

For anyone who played the first Xtreme, the setup of this game will likely be very familiar. You once again have 3 routes, with the first two each having half of the bosses, and the 3rd one (unlocked after beating the first two) has all 8 of them as well as the real final boss to fight. However, instead of just differently named difficulties like the last game, now it’s X mode and Zero mode, and then Xtreme mode where you can swap between them whenever a lot like Mega Man X3 does. However, this game is just as much a victim of its own ambition as it is just poorly designed.

The adapted levels are ones left over and not yet adapted in Xtreme 1, and its pretty clear that all the best ones had already been taken. As far as both the bosses and the stages go, they feel far more poorly adapted than the previous game’s (including one of the worst bike stages in the franchise), especially ones Zero has to fight who were never intended to be fought with him. What takes the cake though are the original levels and bosses. This is up there with the other worst MM games in just thinking “good Mega Man levels are hard” and running from there. They are unfair, difficult, and grueling trials of memory and attrition, and the true final boss is easily one of the worst bosses in the whole franchise.

As far as the presentation goes, this is once again really flexing just what the GBC was capable of. The animations especially look really impressive in just how many frames they get for the player characters. The music is also once again not really anything to write home about, as while its doing its best to adapt the tracks from the games its adapting, the GBC sound chip can only do so much. They’re noble attempts, but I’d stick with the original versions myself.

Verdict: Not Recommended. This is easily one of the worst traditional Mega Man games ever made. While it isn’t the absolute bottom of the pile of the ones I’ve played, it’s very very close at either #2 or #3. Even if you’re a big Mega Man fan, this is a game where it’s pretty darn hard to get much fun out of it, and you’re likely better off avoiding it entirely.
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Note
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Re: Games Beaten 2022

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1. Star Soldier: Vanishing Earth (N64)
2. Street Fighter III: 3rd Strike (Arcade)*
3. Metal Slug 6 (PS2)
4. Time Crisis II (PS2)*
5. Virtua Fighter 5: Final Showdown (360)
6. Shining the Holy Ark (SAT)
7. Final Fantasy Mystic Quest (SNES)
8. Soul Blazer (SNES)
9. Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles IV: Turtles in Time (SNES)*

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10. Warriors of Fate (Switch)

My partner and I enjoy playing beat 'em ups together, so I ended up grabbing the Capcom Belt Action collection for her. I was able to pick-up an import copy of the collection at a local mom and pop game store last summer, Video Games NY, which has a great selection of imports and indie Switch titles. They are now publishing indie titles as well, under the name VGNY Soft. My partner is traveling for the week, so I'm borrowing the Switch and clocking in some hours on it.

I've wanted to try Warriors of Fate for a while, I never saw it in the arcades and wasn't aware of it until I was looking up Sega Saturn imports and came across it. The original arcade was released in 1992, and the ports to the Saturn and Playstation were released in 1996. I thought a feudal Japan themed beat 'em up by Capcom, which was weapons based, sounded pretty awesome. So I was excited to see that it was included in this collection, and it was the first game I wanted to try. It turns out, the game lived up to my expectations.

Warriors of Fate has a total of nine levels and five characters to select from, for my playthrough I chose Subutai. Up to three players can play at the same time, but I was playing solo. Subutai has a longer reach, but his physical attacks are slightly weaker, and is the only character in the game without a special throw. Regarding the moveset, you have access to a regular attack, a throw, a special ability, a dash attack, and a special throw. Subutai's special ability is an uppercut slash, and it looks very familiar to a Shoryuken from Street Fighter, except with a sword in hand as well. This beat 'em up is a bit more violent than the others in Capcom's selection, as you can see blood on screen after most attacks. And with some attacks, you'll even slice enemies in half, which I was surprised by.

An element I particularly liked in this game was the level design. As you traverse through the game, you will go through forests, burning villages, ships, and rivers. The areas with the river is particularly cool as your character is about knee deep in water, and I think the graphic effect looks really good. I wish more beat 'em ups featured some type of water area! Another thing I enjoyed were the bonus levels. In the first bonus stage, you have to try to eat more food than the other characters by pressing a button at a rapid pace and moving the joystick. In the second bonus level, which is totally different, is a sequence of dummies that you have to attack.

I really enjoyed Warriors of Fate! It's a lot of fun and it's too bad we didn't get this game in the US. At the time, 3D polygonal graphics were seen as the new thing, so that's perhaps why the game wasn't ported over to the PS1 or Saturn back in 1996 when it hit stores in Japan. It's too bad, because I think this is a great game that we missed out on. I definitely recommend trying this one out if you're a fan of the genre!
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Re: Games Beaten 2022

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1. Record of Lodoss War - Deedlit in Wonder Labyrinth (PC)(Action Adventure)
2. The Citadel (PC)(FPS)
3. Gothic 3 (PC)(RPG)
4. Witchaven (PC)(FPS)
5. Unpacking (PC)(Puzzle)
6. Firewatch (PC)(Adventure)
7. Perilous Warp (PC)(FPS)

8. The Ascent (PC)(RPG)
9. Borderlands: Game of the Year Enhanced - The Zombie Island of Dr. Ned (PC)(FPS/RPG)
10. Borderlands: Game of the Year Enhanced - The Secret Armory of General Knoxx (PC)(FPS/RPG)
11. Borderlands: Game of the Year Enhanced - Claptrap's New Robot Revolution (PC)(FPS/RPG)

12. Kingdom of the Dead (PC)(FPS)
13. Monument (PC)(FPS)
14. Bloodwash (PC)(Horror Adventure)
15. Dead Estate (PC)(Isometric Shooter)

16. Lost in Vivo (PC)(Survival Horror)
17. Star Explorers (PC)(FPS)

This is technically an FPS, which is what interested me, but it's also a space sim with some elements of dungeon crawling. Basically, Star Explorers is what you would have if No Man's Sky had been released in 1994. It's lo-fi, it throws you in a universe of potentially endless size and randomization, and it gives you the option to explore how you want almost from the very beginning. Yes, there are some elements of gatekeeping, but those primarily consist of upgrading your spacesuit to handle certain biomes and temperatures.

It is the future. Earth is destroyed, and humanity now resides on a single mothership. That ship requires a lot of fuel. You're a lone pilot with your own ship, and you have now been defacto recruited to help save humanity. The first task? Fine planets with fuel. You'll also need to find objects that scientists on the mothership want. And you'll eventually need to discover a new homeworld for humans.

This means you will travel across sectors of space, visit a variety of stars, analyze orbiting planets, and then travel down to them. I saw a wide variety in my explorations: developing worlds covered in lava and under constant meteor showers. Barren worlds of rock and frozen mercury. Vibrant worlds under an ammonia fog populated by intelligent life. Vast wind storms raging across wastelands. The ruins of alien civilizations that I could explore. And, of course, caves. Because your meat and potatoes is surveying caves to find the materials that humanity needs to power the mothership as well as craft necessary weapons, suit upgrades, and equipment.

Star Explorers has a rudimentary crafting system. You find a blueprint, you find a raw element, a metal, and a third required object (could be alien tech, alien body parts, or a kind of gemstone), and you make the object. Maybe it's something as simple as an oxygen tank to add to your stockpile for topping off your air supply on planets lacking an oxygen atmosphere. Maybe it's a new rocket launcher for help in both combat as well as knocking away barriers in caves and ruins. Maybe it's alien tech that makes your spaceship never need fuel. Many of the blueprints you find probably won't be more than fodder for cash, but you will occasionally stumble across one you could really use. So you save them and keep seeking the components you need.

Your spacesuit plays a major role in the game, because it tells you what conditions it can operate in without sustaining damage. Since humanity is now off Earth, everything is in the Kelvin scale, and you start with a range of around 400-200 Kelvin. You can go visit a planet where the nighttime gets down to 50 Kelvin, and your suit will deteriorate until it breaks and you likely freeze to death. Conversely, your suit also can build up protection against radiation, mercury, acid, and ammonia. Go swimming in a mercury lake without the resistance maxed out? Yep, your suit's taking damage, and you may find out what extreme mercury poisoning is like while it fills your lungs. Trust me, you don't want that.

I had a blast with Star Explorers. The variety of planets may seem limited at first, but eventually you start to discover the truly weird things the universe has to offer you. I lived for those moments. My first alien ruin that I explored was on a planet swept by constant windstorms, so just sprinting to the ruin was a mad dash. This game wants you to visit and see a universe...at least in graphics that would stand out on an Amiga 1200. And I loved it.
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Re: Games Beaten 2022

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1. Star Soldier: Vanishing Earth (N64)
2. Street Fighter III: 3rd Strike (Arcade)*
3. Metal Slug 6 (PS2)
4. Time Crisis II (PS2)*
5. Virtua Fighter 5: Final Showdown (360)
6. Shining the Holy Ark (SAT)
7. Final Fantasy Mystic Quest (SNES)
8. Soul Blazer (SNES)
9. Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles IV: Turtles in Time (SNES)*
10. Warriors of Fate (Switch)

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11. Knights of the Round (Switch)

Knights of the Round is a game I remember seeing ads for in Nintendo Power back in the day and was curious about for a long time, but I never knew anyone that had it, and unfortunately I never ran across it at a rental shop back then either. It wasn't until much later when I eventually played a bit of it through emulation. This is another weapons based Capcom beat 'em up with some elements that distinguish it from the others in their catalogue.

Knights of the Round gives you a choice of three characters to pick from, Lancelot, Arthur, and Perceval. Lancelot is the weaker but quicker character, Arthur is the rounded out character, and Perceval is the stronger but slower character. For this playthrough, I chose Arthur. A few elements that are unique to the game are the leveling system, which is basic, but still a nice feature, and the ability to ride a horse as you didn't see this in games of this genre, there are also some small cutscenes before certain levels, where you see troops.

Graphics wise, I think Knights of the Round does look good for the time it was released. The boss sprites are huge and probably the most impressive graphical element in the game. I especially appreciate the look of the Iron Golem boss, I was pretty surprised by the size of him on screen. The other visual element I like about Knights of the Round is the look of your character changes based on what level your character is. This game includes a basic points system, similar to what was also seen in the King of Dragons, and as your level increases, the look of your character changes, which is a great touch, especially for the time of release.

I have two nitpicks about the game. The first is that when riding on the horse, you don't have any back attack. In Warriors of Fate, you do have the option to attack enemies behind you while on the horse, and I think not having this ability is quite a hinderance. You can still turn yourself around on the horse in Knights of the Round, but it's too slow if you're in a jam. I really wish this attack was included. My other nitpick, is that I found the blocking input which is supposed to be back and attack at the same time to be tough to execute sometimes, especially when enemies are swirling around you and might cross you up. I kinda wish that the block function was assigned it's own button.

Overall this is a really fun beat 'em up and I recommend it to anyone that's a fan of the genre! I would like to finally track down the SNES cart, so I can play it on my CRT setup and compare it to the arcade version on the Belt Action Collection in which I played it on. Definitely give it a go if you haven't already!
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