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PartridgeSenpai
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Re: Games Beaten 2021

by PartridgeSenpai Thu Sep 09, 2021 8:09 am

Partridge Senpai's 2021 Beaten Games:
Previously: 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
* indicates a repeat

Games 1~51
1. Atelier Rorona: The Alchemist of Arland (PS3)
2. Portal 2 (PC) *
3. Atelier Judie: The Alchemist of Gramnad (PS2)
4. Pipo Saru 2001 (PS2)
5. Mystical Ninja Starring Goemon (N64)
6. Atelier Viorate: The Alchemist of Gramnad 2 (PS2)
7. Kirby's Dream Land 3 (SFC)
8. The Legend of Mystical Ninja (SFC)
9. Atelier Marie: The Alchemist of Salburg (PS1)
10. Ganbare Goemon 2 (SFC)
11. Paper Mario: Origami King (Switch)
12. Star Fox 64 (N64) *
13. Super Paper Mario (Wii) *
14. Paper Mario: The Thousand Year Door (GC) *
15. Demon's Crest (SNES)
16. Cathedral (Switch)
17. Super Mario 3D World (Switch) *
18. Bowser's Fury (Switch)
19. Rogue Heroes: Ruins of Tasos (Switch)
20. moon (Switch)
21. Casltevania 64 (N64)
22. Captain Rainbow (Wii)
23. Doraemon: Nobita To Mittsu No Seireiseki (N64)
24. Blast Corps (N64)
25. Doraemon 2: Nobita To Hikari No Shinden (N64)
26. Custom Robo (N64)
27. Doraemon 3: Nobita No Machi SOS! (N64)
28. 64 Trump Collection: Alice No Wakuwaku Trump World (N64)
29. The Sunken City (PS4)
30. Lair of the Clockwork God (Switch)
31. Star Fox Adventures (GC)
32. Atelier Elie: The Alchemist of Salburg 2 (PS1)
33. Billy Hatcher & The Giant Egg (GC)
34. Mole Mania (GB)
35. Gargoyle's Quest (GB)
36. Rock Man 4 (Famicom) *
37. Wai Wai World (Famicom)
38. Mega Man: Dr. Wily's Revenge (GB)
39. Mega Man (Switch) *
40. Mega Man 2 (Switch) *
41. Mega Man 3 (Switch) *
42. Rock Man 5 (Famicom) *
43. Mega Man 6 (Switch)
44. Mega Man 7 (Switch) *
45. Mega Man 8 (Switch) *
46. Mega Man 9 (Switch) *
47. Mega Man 10 (Switch)
48. Rock Man World 2 (GB) *
49. Rock Man World 3 (GB)
50. Rock Man World 4 (GB)
51. Rock Man World 5 (GB)

52. Wai Wai World 2 (Famicom)
53. Tiny Toon Adventures (Famicom)
54. King Kong 2: Ikari No Megaton Punch (Famicom)
55. Yume Pengin Monogatari (Famicom)
56. Rock Man & Forte (SFC)
57. Rock Man X2 (Switch)
58. Rock Man X3 (Switch)
59. Rock Man X4 (Switch)
60. Rock Man X5 (Switch)
61. Rock Man X6 (Switch)
62. Rock Man X7 (Switch)
63. Rock Man X8 (Switch)
64. Mega Man: Powered Up (PSP)
65. Magical Taruruuto Kun: FANTASTIC WORLD!! (Famicom)
66. Maken Shao (PS2)
67. Getsu Fuuma Den (Famicom)
68. Rock Man D.A.S.H (PSP)
69. Brave Fencer Musashi (PS1)
70. Joe & Mac (SFC) *
71. Atelier Lilie: The Alchemist of Salburg 3 (PS2)
72. Zelda 2: The Adventure of Link (Famicom)
73. The Bouncer (PS2)
74. Rapid Angel (PS1)
75. Atelier Totori: The Alchemist of Arland 2 (PS3)
76. Drakengard 3 (PS3)
77. Alwa's Awakening (Switch)
78. Hermina & Culus (PS2)
79. Atelier Meruru: The Alchemist of Arland 3 (PS3)
80. Splatterhouse: Wanpaku Graffiti (Switch)
81. Atelier Iris: Eternal Mana (PS2)
82. Atelier Iris: Eternal Mana 2 (PS2)
83. Mario Kart 64 (N64)
84. Super Mario Kart (SFC)
85. Mario Kart Super Circuit (3DS)
86. Legend of Zelda: The Ocarina of Time (N64) *
87. Legend of Zelda: Majora's Mask (N64) *
88. Legend of Zelda: Minish Cap (3DS) *
89. Rock Man X: Command Mission (GC)
90. Pikmin (GC) *
91. Legend of Zelda: Four Swords Adventures (GC) *
92. Far East of Eden 2: Manjimaru (GC)
93. Pikmin 2 (GC) *
94. Legend of Zelda: Wind Waker (GC) *

95. Shin Megami Tensei (SFC)

This is a favorite series of a few friends of mine that I've always been too intimidated to touch. The SMT series has always seemed super hard and unforgiving in ways that have made me too scared to engage with it, but I finally decided to take the plunge and see just why my friend likes them so much. With lots of pointers from my friends DogStrong and Fii, I was able to make it through to the end of the Japanese version of the game. It took me about 40 hours to beat the game with the neutral ending. I played it on the Switch Online Super Famicom service with liberal usage of rewinds and save states, because heckin' damn does this game hate you sometimes XD

SMT is the third game in the series but it's the first in the series (as I understand it) to take the concept and tell its own story rather than be beholden to the original books in a meaningful way. You start out as just a normal teenager in Tokyo who wakes up one day to see a message on your computer from Steven [Hawking], who has discovered demons living in the internet and has made a program to allow people to befriend and summon them. From there, a whirlwind of things happen (you're falsely arrested for murder, the Japanese Self Defense Force initiates a coup, the American military initiates a counter attack, America launches ICMBs and ends the world) that lead you eventually to walking through a ruined Tokyo trying to make sense of exactly what these forces of Law and Chaos are doing and how you can affect it.

While I could spend all day explaining the details of the story itself, the broad strokes of the story are a combat between the forces of Law and Chaos for control of a world gone to ruin. You can alter your alignment via certain story actions, and where you ultimately end up decides which fate the world will take. Law, Chaos, or a neutral route siding with neither. SMT 1 does have characters other than yourself who have important roles, but none of them really have arcs or meaningful character writing. The bigger narrative in SMT is the philosophical discussion at hand between the forces of Law and Chaos, and how your actions determine which side of that equation you fall on. It's a really interesting and deep game for 1992, and I found it very engaging, even if character writing is much more usually my thing.

The gameplay of SMT is that of Megami Tensei but more refined, that system being that which originated monster catching and fighting. You have your main character (whom I named SMTCHAMP) who can summon demons but not use magic, and then you have several other NPCs who join and leave your party throughout the story who learn a bit of magic instead of having your computer powers of summoning demons. It has a simple armor and weapons system, melee weapons for single targets and guns (and different types of often status-inflicting ammo) for groups, and a leveling system where instead of gradual stat increases, you pick one of your six stats (strength, intelligence, magic, vitality, agility, and luck) to put a point into to raise your stats a certain way. This leads to level ups not really being that important in and of themselves, but ultimately having a lot of influence on your power level.

Your level is also very important because it affects which demons you can summon and fuse, as that's a lot of the bread and butter of the game. Most demons you encounter can be engaged with in conversation instead of fighting them. Once you talk them down, you get to a negotiating menu where you can ask for all sorts of things (money, friendship, magnetite (which we will get to later)), and they generally want some kind of currency or amount of healing items to join your party. Once they join you, they are in a stagnent position. This isn't Pokemon. A demon is exactly as powerful when they join you as they will ever be. You get level ups; they don't. What you do when you want stronger demons but don't want to befriend new ones (or abandon old friends) is go to the demon summoning Dark Church, where you can fuse demons into new and more powerful ones. SMT overall isn't a super hard game compared to a lot of the later (and earlier) games in its series, but making sure you have the right demons for the fight at hand is key to victory in many fights, especially in the early game.

The fights themselves play out surprisingly well for a game this old. Enemies generally only appear one type at a time but with several members of that group of demons (one to eight members). You can't specify which of these you want your party to attack, but the allied AI is often very good at focusing down wounded enemies, avoiding enemies who are stunned or have a status making fighting otherwise impossible for them, and there's even feedback on the screen to show you which of the enemy mob in particular are being damaged. It's a really well done battle system that I was routinely surprised by the robustness of. There's even an auto-battle system to help you through the game's absolutely nuts encounter rate (which is often pretty brutal), and the auto battle even remembers if you last used melee or guns to keep fighting like that!

The main meat of the gameplay outside of combat is first-person dungeon crawling. Now I know that sounds like somewhat of a nightmare, especially given that virtually all areas in a particular dungeon don't look terribly memorable or distinct from one another, but the game does the best it can to mitigate that. As you go through an area, you fill out an automatic map in your arm-terminal computer that you use to summon demons. You can check this map whenever you want, and it helps a lot with getting lost. Checking it is a bit cumbersome, but it's certainly better than having no map at all.

The game, however, has a fair few issues that make it pretty difficult to go back to if you aren't using rewinds and save states. Demons can only be summoned and befriended if you're the right alignment. Law can't summon Chaos and vice versa, but neutral can summon anybody. This wouldn't be so bad if it weren't so hard to change your alignment or check what actually influences it (alignment management is one of the most important reasons to have a reference guide open for the game, imo), so you can suddenly be Chaos and not even realize it because you did one thing wrong, and there are only so many scripted opportunities to shift your alignment again before you're just out of options and stuck on the route you're on. Thankfully, you can check your alignment on the overworld whenever you want by checking which way your little marker is spinning (or wobbling in place, if you're neutral), but alignment management and the way it affects gameplay is a bit of a pain.

Another BIG problem is player information. Spells have effects, weapons have complicated stats (how many times they hit, what statuses they do or don't inflict, whom they can be wielded by), and items have effects to. There is not a single mechanism in-game for you to learn what ANY of these things are. Giving the player the information they need to even make basic choices outside of sheer trial and error is a remnant of design philosophy from when this game came out that I am SO happy has died out of popular usage.

Another big issues is that the game can just be very mean when it comes to punishing you for mistakes you couldn't have seen coming. The start of the game in particular (basically until the ICBMs drop) is a really rough time where getting ambushed by a group of tough enemies that happen to hang around Shinjuku means you're just dead unless you run (if you even CAN run). The dungeons in the game can also be really mean in how they put floor traps, invisible pit falls, and invisible teleports around. The dungeon design can be very mean in how they mostly just seem put together to waste both your time and resources before you can get to the big boss at the end. These points of meanness don't exactly make it unique among JRPGs at the time, not even close, but it's one more thing that makes this a pain to go back to in 2021.

The presentation of the game is very nice, if a bit simple at times. The game doesn't have many musical tracks, but what's there fits the dreary, desolate tone well. The graphics are very nice in some places, and more boring in others. Environments are generally very dull and repetitive, while monster designs are often very cool and distinct, especially when it comes to bosses. You can tell Atlus is still getting its sea legs in regards to the Super Famicom, but they're already more than halfway there to a winning formula.

Verdict: Hesitantly Recommended. This is a mean game that is also super cool and fun when it isn't making you curse at the pitfall you just fell down or the paralysis trapped you just stepped on for the third time. The philosophy in the story is engaging and the monster fights and capturing are unique and fun, and if you can get past just how much of a bully the game can be at times, there's a lot to enjoy here. These days, I think the most easy way to enjoy the game is to be able to save state or rewind to brute force your way through those pit falls and traps whenever you want, but to each their own on that point. SMT is a series I was scared to ever try, but after how much fun I had with it, but I'm really glad I gave it a shot, and you just might be too~
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Re: Games Beaten 2021

by Blu Thu Sep 09, 2021 10:28 am

Just chiming in to state it's wild how quickly you get through games, Partridge. It blows dsheinem's running tally out of the water.
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Re: Games Beaten 2021

by PartridgeSenpai Thu Sep 09, 2021 11:25 am

Blu wrote:Just chiming in to state it's wild how quickly you get through games, Partridge. It blows dsheinem's running tally out of the water.


Awww, shucks ^^;

You aren't the only one to say that though. Friends I hang with on Discord have started calling me "the Game Destroyer" because I "destroy" games so fast :lol: . I'm not TRYING to go through them fast. I just play games very fixedly until I finish them ^^;
I identify everyone via avatar, so if you change your avatar, I genuinely might completely forget who you are. -- Me
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Re: Games Beaten 2021

by REPO Man Thu Sep 09, 2021 7:16 pm

Espgaluda II, Arcade Mode on Nintendo Switch. Yet another excellent bullet hell shmup for the Switch. We definitely need more Cave shooters on the Switch. And yes, I know there's a forthcoming Deathsmiles 1 and 2 compilation.
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Re: Games Beaten 2021

by MrPopo Sat Sep 11, 2021 1:12 am

Previous Years: 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

First 50:
1. EYE: Divine Cybermancy - PC
2. Legend of Grimrock - PC
3. Legend of Grimrock 2 - PC
4. Shovel Knight - Wii U
5. Yakuza: Like a Dragon - PS4
6. Yoshi's Island - SNES
7. Vectorman 2 - Genesis
8. Super Mario Sunshine - GC
9. The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time Master Quest - GC
10. Bomberman '93 - TG-16
11. Cannon Fodder - PC
12. Panzer Dragoon II Zwei - Saturn
13. Dragonborne - Game Boy
14. Rock n' Roll Racing - PC
15. The Lost Vikings - PC
16. Blackthorne - PC
17. Contra III: The Alien Wars - SNES
18. Bravely Default II - Switch
19. Axelay - SNES
20. Ryse: Son of Rome - XBOne
21. Killer Instinct (2013) - XBOne
22. Heretic Kingdoms: The Inquisition - PC
23. Thief: The Dark Project - PC
24. Killer Instinct - XBOne
25. Killer instinct 2 - XBOne
26. Record of Lodoss War: Deedlit in Wonder Labyrinth - PC
27. Thief 2: The Metal Age - PC
28. Wing Commander II - PC
29. Wing Commander III - PC
30. The Legend of Heroes: Trails of Cold Steel IV - Switch
31. Shadow Man Remastered - PC
32. Wing Commander: Privateer - PC
33. Salt and Sanctuary - Switch
34. The Elder Scrolls: Arena - PC
35. The Elder Scrolls II: Daggerfall - PC
36. Resident Evil Village - PC
37. SaGa Frontier Remastered - Switch
38. Metaloid: Origin - Switch
39. SaGa Scarlet Grace: Ambitions - Switch
40. Metro Exodus: The Two Colonels - PC
41. Metro Exodus: Sam's Story - PC
42. Panzer Paladin - Switch
43. Returnal - PS5
44. Dark Void Zero - DSiWare
45. Panzer Dragoon Saga - Saturn
46. Magic Knight Rayearth - Saturn
47. Cathedral - Switch
48. Final Fantasy VII Remake: INTERmission - PS5
49. Eterium - PC
50. A Street Cat's Tale - Switch

51. Bug Fables: The Everlasting Sapling - Switch
52. Banner of the Maid - Switch
53. CrossCode - Switch
54. Total Annihilation: The Core Contingency - PC
55. Ultima Underworld - PC
56. Betrayal at Krondor - PC
57. Assassin's Creed: Origins - PC
58. Axiom Verge 2 - Switch
59. Elderborn - PC
60. Hellbound - PC
61. Wargroove - Switch
62. Eye of the Beholder - PC
63. Quake: Dimension of the Past - PC
64. Quake: Dimension of the Machine - PC
65. Legends of Amberland: The Forgotten Crown - Switch
66. Anopek - PC
67. Baten Kaitos - Gamecube
68. No More Heroes 3 - Switch
69. Eye of the Beholder II - PC
70. Eye of the Beholder III - PC
71. Hedon II - PC

Available for free to all existing owners, Hedon II follows up the original and is presented as a second episode inside the overall Hedon fork of GZDoom. For the most part it's a very iterative sequel, taking what the original did and turning it up another notch. There are some rough patches mostly due to asking the Doom engine to do more than it was designed to, but overall it's an incredibly fun experience.

The game picks up immediately after the first one; since you failed to prevent the bad lady from stealing the cool item you need to chase her down. The game is divided into a mixture of standalone levels and hub levels in the vein of Hexen. You do a couple of standalone levels to get used to things, then get a hub that still ends up being fairly set in stone (each large area is barred behind completing the previous one), a couple more standalones, then a huge hub that you continuously have to hop between the various maps Hexen-style to get all the key items you need to open the exit, followed by one last standalone culminating in a boss fight.

The game only adds one new weapon (as well as giving you full access to the Hellclaw that was in the intro of the first game), but it's awesome. Every FPS is made better with a badass minigun, and this one certainly pleases. It's the items that end up providing more options, including a really awesome nuke everything on the screen spell that's incredibly useful to power through the last couple phases of the final boss.

One weakness the game does have is it wants to do more with storytelling and characterization, but the Doom engine really doesn't want you to do text. When a character talks you get a quick grunt to let you know a line has appeared and then a subtitle with the text appears. This is clumsy during the "mission briefing" segments, but is downright awful during hectic story battles where important information can be conveyed but you might not see it. You also just miss out on bits of story dialog in the process. The first game didn't introduce NPCs until late in the game so this wasn't nearly as apparent.

The game ends up being a very good balance between boomer shooter action and more exploratory stuff. For the most part you get good amounts of breaks between the two, and combing the ginormous stages pays off big time in terms of useful items and weapons. But when it's time to fight the game isn't shy about dropping a ton of enemies on you. There's even a full on Serious Sam segment near the end where you have one longass bridge and a fuckton of enemies that spawn in giant waves that need to be blown through, culminating in a big arena with another giant wave and a miniboss. The game has a little something for everyone who enjoys action heavy FPS's.

If you enjoyed the first you owe it to yourself to play the second. Steam copies do need to uninstall and reinstall due to wonkiness in how Steam detects the changes. If you haven't yet jumped on the Hedon train there's no better time than now.
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Re: Games Beaten 2021

by Ack Sat Sep 11, 2021 4:51 pm

1. Frog Detective 2: The Case of the Invisible Wizard (PC)(Adventure)
2. Revulsion (PC)(FPS)
3. Nonogram - Master's Legacy (PC)(Puzzle)
4. Sekiro (PC)(Action-Adventure)
5. Grim Dawn (PC)(Action RPG)
6. Grim Dawn: Ashes of Malmouth (PC)(Action RPG)
7. Grim Dawn: Forgotten Gods (PC)(Action RPG)

8. Viscera Cleanup Detail: Santa's Rampage (PC)(FPS)
9. Viscera Cleanup Detail: Shadow Warrior (PC)(FPS)
10. Shrine (PC)(FPS)
11. Record of Lodoss War - Deedlit in Wonder Labyrinth (PC)(Adventure)
12. Forgotten Realms: Demon Stone (PC)(Action)
13. Red Alliance (PC)(FPS)
14. The Forest (PC)(Horror)
15. Pixel Puzzles: Japan (PC)(Puzzle)
16. 12 is Better Than 6 (PC)(Top Down Shooter)
17. Torchlight II (PC)(RPG)

18. An Elder Scrolls Legend: Battlespire (PC)(RPG)
19. Port of Call (PC)(Walking Sim)

20. NeonCode (PC)(Walking Sim)
21. Carrion (PC)(Adventure)
22. Dr. Langeskov, The Tiger, and The Terribly Cursed Emerald: A Whirlwind Heist (PC)(Walking Sim)
23. Helltaker (PC)(Puzzle)
24. Warhammer 40,000: Inquisitor - Martyr (PC)(RPG)

25. Castlevania: Bloodlines (Switch)(Platformer)
26. Treachery in Beatdown City (Switch)(RPG)
27. Zeno Clash (PC)(Action)
28. Borderlands: Enhanced Edition (PC)(FPS/RPG)
29. Ion Fury (PC)(FPS)
30. Wolfenstein: The Old Blood (PC)(FPS)
31. Shrine II (PC)(FPS)
32. Lycanthorn I (PC)(Action Platformer)


Both the Shrine and Lycanthorn games are total conversions for Doom II. I'll get into them separately, but if you're wondering in general what to expect from controls and the like, it's GZDoom with some pushing that isn't always successful. How so? Well, I'm glad you asked.


Shrine II

Shrine II is your tried and true FPS: you get guns, you find enemies, you shoot them in the face until they die. While everything has been modified to fit the simplistic but creepy art style of the Shrine games, many of the basic sprites and enemy behaviors of Doom can still be identified if you take a moment to look at how things are shaped and move. Yes, I can identify a Mancubus from its outline, and yes, you should be able to as well if you enjoy your old school FPS.

However, its the weird points where Shrine II shines. You once again play a skinless thing in this game, but you're now wearing a jaunty hat that flies off when you die. The game says it's Lovecraftian, but outside of some specific locales and the occasional monster design, it misses the mark on this. What it does give me are some interesting weapons, an item system that feels more like Heretic than Doom, and more boss fights than I can shake a stick at. Levels range from the straightforward to the physics-warping, as you plunge through alternate netherworlds, old castles, underground caves, and so on.

Surprisingly, Shrine II manages to steer away from the traditional shotgun-forward approach, in part because the shotgun is a sort of hybrid mix with a chain-gun, and partly because its ammo max is low and enemies are sponge-fests. That's ok, it breeds versatility, so you'll learn to get comfortable with your other weapons, like a cross that shoots waves of holy energy, a stick that summons hell hounds (and lets you pet them), and a mortar launcher that also doubles as a napalm thrower. Oh, and that's not even getting into your bone blade which lets you fly short distances to provide greater mobility both in the air and on the ground.

And you'll need all these weapons, because enemies take a lot of hits, and there are a lot of bosses. The bosses are also generally well designed, providing much more of an interesting challenge with their attacks than the usual strafe-shoot combo that plagues most early FPS boss fights. You need to duck behind cover, need to lead their area denial projectiles into walls, and need to abuse your items to really shift some of these battles in your favor. Hell, one fight against a flaming angel lady ended up requiring I abuse items to change how my guns worked; she ate up all my ammo otherwise, and even with a big axe that shoots fireballs, I wasn't able to take her or the inferno-summoning sword she could pull out.

Unfortunately, due to enemies being bullet sponges and some questionable design decisions in a few later levels, Shrine II ends up feeling more amateurish by the end. And then you reach the final boss, and the amount of particle effects it puts out brings the frame rate down to 1...which is incredibly impressive for a game built on tech from 30 years ago. Hell yeah, I kicked his ass once I could actually move again.

Also, the game is free on Steam. Can't beat that price. Also, it's still undergoing some development, with v2.0 due out in 2022, now with reading! Hey, look, the last major update included the ability to pet the summoned hell hound, so reading feels like a solid upgrade.


Lycanthorn I

Imagine if the original Castlevania was even more bare bones but was an FPS. That's Lycanthorn I; you fight vampires, maneuver through levels, and in general use your ax and holy water to take down monsters while hunting for a vampire queen. You basically only have your ax and holy water, and there are only about six enemy types in the game not including the bosses in each level, but yeah, it's definitely meant to invoke Castlevania. The opening level even hits you with a tune that sounds like NES Castlevania, and the simplicity of the graphics and color style match it.

As a result, there really isn't a lot of depth to what you're doing. There are some nasty tricks involving platforming, so much so that I don't want to call this an FPS since you're not really shooting and you're spending a lot of time jumping, but in general things aren't that advanced. Enemies go down well, but bosses are slogs which main consist of you strafing around to avoid their attacks while you lay into them. That's pretty much it for the strategy for most, and a couple can also be stunlocked if you attack fast enough.

Unfortunately there are also some balance issues here, such as level design proving claustrophobic enough that the sponge-bosses don't feel fair, particularly in the final levels. Only two bosses move too, but the static guys are so big, you feel like you're stuck in a crawl space moving around their girth. And since they take so long to bring down, and you only have one special weapon as apparently all the rest were removed from the original release, you'll probably hear the soundtrack loop for that level. That's...something.

But then there is the final battle, which again involves you circle-strafing a giant vampire woman whose body is primarily composed of her energy-spewing face-vagina, and you wonder what the hell you are doing trolling the depths of Steam's indie FPS releases at 3am, and all of your life choices suddenly make absolutely no sense as you weep yourself to slumber in your office chair. You're not an adult, you're at best a man-child, and this is your reward! Now go back to counseling!

Sorry, it was a long night. The game is an interesting experiment but nothing more.

Lycanthorn I can only be played via Lycanthorn II on Steam, so keep in mind that it's not really meant to be taken on its own. Also, Lycanthorn II is free on Steam, so hey, why not?
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PartridgeSenpai
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Re: Games Beaten 2021

by PartridgeSenpai Mon Sep 13, 2021 12:55 am

Partridge Senpai's 2021 Beaten Games:
Previously: 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
* indicates a repeat

Games 1~51
1. Atelier Rorona: The Alchemist of Arland (PS3)
2. Portal 2 (PC) *
3. Atelier Judie: The Alchemist of Gramnad (PS2)
4. Pipo Saru 2001 (PS2)
5. Mystical Ninja Starring Goemon (N64)
6. Atelier Viorate: The Alchemist of Gramnad 2 (PS2)
7. Kirby's Dream Land 3 (SFC)
8. The Legend of Mystical Ninja (SFC)
9. Atelier Marie: The Alchemist of Salburg (PS1)
10. Ganbare Goemon 2 (SFC)
11. Paper Mario: Origami King (Switch)
12. Star Fox 64 (N64) *
13. Super Paper Mario (Wii) *
14. Paper Mario: The Thousand Year Door (GC) *
15. Demon's Crest (SNES)
16. Cathedral (Switch)
17. Super Mario 3D World (Switch) *
18. Bowser's Fury (Switch)
19. Rogue Heroes: Ruins of Tasos (Switch)
20. moon (Switch)
21. Casltevania 64 (N64)
22. Captain Rainbow (Wii)
23. Doraemon: Nobita To Mittsu No Seireiseki (N64)
24. Blast Corps (N64)
25. Doraemon 2: Nobita To Hikari No Shinden (N64)
26. Custom Robo (N64)
27. Doraemon 3: Nobita No Machi SOS! (N64)
28. 64 Trump Collection: Alice No Wakuwaku Trump World (N64)
29. The Sunken City (PS4)
30. Lair of the Clockwork God (Switch)
31. Star Fox Adventures (GC)
32. Atelier Elie: The Alchemist of Salburg 2 (PS1)
33. Billy Hatcher & The Giant Egg (GC)
34. Mole Mania (GB)
35. Gargoyle's Quest (GB)
36. Rock Man 4 (Famicom) *
37. Wai Wai World (Famicom)
38. Mega Man: Dr. Wily's Revenge (GB)
39. Mega Man (Switch) *
40. Mega Man 2 (Switch) *
41. Mega Man 3 (Switch) *
42. Rock Man 5 (Famicom) *
43. Mega Man 6 (Switch)
44. Mega Man 7 (Switch) *
45. Mega Man 8 (Switch) *
46. Mega Man 9 (Switch) *
47. Mega Man 10 (Switch)
48. Rock Man World 2 (GB) *
49. Rock Man World 3 (GB)
50. Rock Man World 4 (GB)
51. Rock Man World 5 (GB)

52. Wai Wai World 2 (Famicom)
53. Tiny Toon Adventures (Famicom)
54. King Kong 2: Ikari No Megaton Punch (Famicom)
55. Yume Pengin Monogatari (Famicom)
56. Rock Man & Forte (SFC)
57. Rock Man X2 (Switch)
58. Rock Man X3 (Switch)
59. Rock Man X4 (Switch)
60. Rock Man X5 (Switch)
61. Rock Man X6 (Switch)
62. Rock Man X7 (Switch)
63. Rock Man X8 (Switch)
64. Mega Man: Powered Up (PSP)
65. Magical Taruruuto Kun: FANTASTIC WORLD!! (Famicom)
66. Maken Shao (PS2)
67. Getsu Fuuma Den (Famicom)
68. Rock Man D.A.S.H (PSP)
69. Brave Fencer Musashi (PS1)
70. Joe & Mac (SFC) *
71. Atelier Lilie: The Alchemist of Salburg 3 (PS2)
72. Zelda 2: The Adventure of Link (Famicom)
73. The Bouncer (PS2)
74. Rapid Angel (PS1)
75. Atelier Totori: The Alchemist of Arland 2 (PS3)
76. Drakengard 3 (PS3)
77. Alwa's Awakening (Switch)
78. Hermina & Culus (PS2)
79. Atelier Meruru: The Alchemist of Arland 3 (PS3)
80. Splatterhouse: Wanpaku Graffiti (Switch)
81. Atelier Iris: Eternal Mana (PS2)
82. Atelier Iris: Eternal Mana 2 (PS2)
83. Mario Kart 64 (N64)
84. Super Mario Kart (SFC)
85. Mario Kart Super Circuit (3DS)
86. Legend of Zelda: The Ocarina of Time (N64) *
87. Legend of Zelda: Majora's Mask (N64) *
88. Legend of Zelda: Minish Cap (3DS) *
89. Rock Man X: Command Mission (GC)
90. Pikmin (GC) *
91. Legend of Zelda: Four Swords Adventures (GC) *
92. Far East of Eden 2: Manjimaru (GC)
93. Pikmin 2 (GC) *
94. Legend of Zelda: Wind Waker (GC) *
95. Shin Megami Tensei (SFC)

96. Metroid Prime (GC)

I love the heck out of Metroidvanias, but the Metroid Prime games have never been something that interested me terribly much. I've never been comfortable with first person games on console, so I just always wrote the series off as something I'd never be able to enjoy. After enjoying Retro Studios's Recore so much last year, I definitely knew it'd be worth my while to eventually check out the Prime series, and August's theme of GameCube games finally pushed me into checking it out. I ended up being a lot more comfortable with it than I thought I ever would. It ended up taking me about 12.5 hours to finish the Japanese version of the game.

Taking place between Metroid 1 and 2, when there were still many Metroids to fight, Metroid Prime has more of a story in it than many prior Metroid games had, but still a fairly light story ultimately. Samus comes across a space pirate station in distress from the biological experiments they've been conducting, and after confronting the monsters hidden there (and losing all her upgrades due to a huge hit to her suit), she goes down to the planet it crashed on to investigate further. The story is mostly told through scanning logs of both the Chozo ruins as well as the space pirates' logs, and these logs were apparently changed significantly from the American release for the Japanese release. Regardless of the changes, the story is generally a very hands-off and atmosphere-heavy experience without a ton of focus on direct storytelling. It makes for a great, isolated atmosphere as you explore Tallon IV.

The gameplay is not so much a first-person shooter so much as a first-person Metroidvania. You explore around one large 3D environment, finding new powerups, fighting enemies, defeating bosses, and solving puzzles to progress. This isn't a more normal first-person game, however, as it uses only the analog stick to move. This works surprisingly well as a control method due to the way you can lock onto enemies with the shoulder buttons. The C-stick and D-pad are used for changing your beam type and visor type respectively, so they couldn't be used for camera controls.

The world and boss design is generally really solid, but there's a few bumps here and there. The first part of the game is really well signposted and put together, but then once you hit around the halfway point, the game suddenly expects you to know to go halfway across the world just to unlock one upgrade just to go back to where you were to keep progressing just slightly further. Given the hellish development cycle this game had, it's nothing short of incredible that it's even as good as it is, but even then, the marks of that troubled development cycle through that bad signposting. There are some other polish issues, such as certain areas (especially the mines) being weirdly devoid of save points despite how long and difficult they are, but the game is more often given a good difficulty curve.

The presentation is really excellent, as one would expect from one of Nintendo's big franchises. You have music that sets the isolated atmosphere really well, and graphics that really impress. The field of view is a bit too narrow at times, and sometimes the lighting strays towards being so dark that it's really difficult to see (in a way that isn't intentional), but it all makes up a really solid package.

The Japanese version of the game tightens some things up compared to the original American release aside from the previously mentioned somewhat altered story. The biggest things are rebalances to make the game just a bit harder. You die a lot faster in poison water (my first and one of my only deaths), and they also made the final boss fight significantly harder. It's nothing that makes this version better or worse than other versions, so far as I can tell, but they're interesting tweaks worth mentioning nonetheless.


Verdict: Highly Recommended. Metroid Prime shows some marks of its troubled development, no question, but it still manages to be a really excellent game regardless. It holds up great all these years later, and is definitely worth checking out for any Metroid or Metroidvania fan. A special shoutout to my friend Fii, who loves this game and did a lot to help me love it too~.

----

97. Bomberman Jetters (GC)

I'm always a sucker for Bomberman games, and I've been on the lookout for these later 3D adventures of his ever since playing through most of the N64 games last year. I finally found this for a price that was way above just being right (beautiful condition, even came with the sealed trading cards, for only like 700 yen), and that made it a perfect addition to my pile of games to play for GameCube month. It took me about 10 hours to beat the Japanese version of the game and also beat the secret final boss.

Bomberman Jetters is a game based on an anime of the same name. That said, the plot is still really simple. The bad guys are tired of Bomberman ruining their plans constantly, so they make a giant meteor to smash into Planet Bomberman. Bomberman and MAX set out in their spaceships to stop this clearly bad thing from happening. It's a really thread bare and unimportant story, ultimately, although it apparently doesn't really follow characterizations in the anime, which is very odd. It has lots of voice acting which is well done and help bring the quite flat characters to life in a fun way, so that's nice at least.

The game itself is a 3D action game (kind of a platformer?) divided between 5 worlds of 6 levels each. Four levels in each world are proper stages, while two of the stages are just boss battles. The mini-bosses (stage 3) of each stage can even be beaten or weakened in certain ways (sometimes requiring re-fights using tools you didn't have yet) to fight an extra, secret final boss at the end. You can also find and unlock animal companions to join you, who give you certain passives and can be leveled up to give you better passives. You can even unlock new and particular elemental bomb types to give you an edge against each world boss. The game plays somewhat like the Baku Bomberman (aka Bomberman 64, in English) games on the N64, but like a marked step backwards.

Jetters's biggest problem is that it really just doesn't play very well and the level design is generally quite weak. They give you much more 360-degree freedom than they did on the N64, but this amounts to making throwing and kicking bombs into enemies a far more difficult task than it already was. I can't even count the number of times I missed a bomb or blew myself up instead of an enemy. Bosses also range from trivially easy (which is most of them, to be honest) to nightmarish and frustrating due to how exact you need your bomb throws to be (like the secret final boss who is in no way shape or form worth fighting). The animal companions and elemental bombs also feel very half-baked, as they all range from totally useless to absolutely essential and grinding up the level of the more essential animal companions gets to be a real pain.

The presentation of the game is fine, but very uninspired. For a mid-life GameCube game, Jetters doesn't exactly look ugly, but it's very uninspired. The music is also generally okay if a bit surreal and weird. The whole game is just a huge, flat "OK", and the presentation is no exception.


Verdict: Not Recommended. This game is actually okay, but that's all it is. It is one of the most aggressively mediocre games I've ever played, and it's just really hard to care about either way because of that. You probably won't hate your time with it, but it'll likely be hard to prompt yourself to actually finish the game unless you're very dedicated to beat it because you can. Your time is better spent playing other, better 3D Bomberman games than this.

----

98. Maximo (PS2)

I don't really remember what exactly prompted me to pick up and play Maximo, but 300 yen was too low a price to turn my nose up at at the time. The result of an effort to bring Ghouls 'n' Ghosts into the 3rd dimension, Maximo began life as an N64 game before being converted into a Dreamcast game and then FINALLY being turned into a PS2 game once the Dreamcast was deemed too dead to release it for. This strange life cycle leaves its marks all over Maximo, but this weird freak of a game still manages to be good fun regardless. It took me about 10 hours to beat the Japanese version of the game.

Maximo, a brave king, gets back from the war to find an evil wizard has kidnapped his queen. He's struck down at once, but the friendly grim reaper saves him, telling him that the evil wizard is stealing dead from the underworld and putting him out of a job. The two team up and get to work freeing the four sorceresses and saving the queen from the wizard's evil clutches. It's a pretty simple story, but it's just Ghouls 'n' Ghosts. It doesn't have to be complicated, and it does just what it needs to while succeeding to be entertaining in its brief, silly cutscenes.

Maximo is a 3D action platformer of five worlds of five levels a piece with a boss at the end of each. The bosses and stages are quite fun and well designed, if pretty brutal in their difficulty at times. Instead of the "two hits and you're dead" thing of its retro inspiration, Maximo takes a more generous and clever approach to updating that old health system. Now you still have armor, and you can even get a third piece of armor, but these each have a health bar. If you find a potion, the health bar of your currently weakened armor will be refilled, but if that armor breaks, it's gone and you'll need to find more armor. There is also a system of powerups to make your weapons swings and shield more powerful, ranging from a sword range extension to being able to throw your mighty shield (just don't use to it too much, or it'll break!). As nice as these things are, you just need to be weary of dying, as take too much damage or fall down a pit and you'll lose nearly all of your powerups and gotta start collecting them fresh, although they thankfully drop fairly frequently.

There's also a money system where you can buy more health, armor, or even collectible underwear (changing the type you have when you lose your armor) when you find the little single-use kiosks in the stages. You could also horde that money for saving (it costs 100 gold per save!), or try to collect fairies from glowing fountains in each stage, as 50 fairies gets you another continue. If you're feeling really up to a challenge, there's even a special reward for collecting 100% of the treasure in every stage. I wasn't unhinged enough to try that, but honestly the game was so fun to go through once, I haven't totally dismissed the concept of going through again and trying for 100% completion someday XD. All in all, it's a really nice upgrade of the old 2D games, keeping the difficulty and iconic elements while upgrading it to make more sense in both 3D and in the world of game design in 2001.

The biggest control and design issue is a relic of this game being a Dreamcast game: the right stick does nothing. Maximo must've been basically finished on the Dreamcast before they decided to make it a PS2 game, because the right stick doesn't control anything, let alone the camera, so the only way you have to redirect the camera is by holding R1 to slowly realign it behind you. It isn't a game breaker, and the game generally does a good job at keeping the camera behind you, but getting used to realigning the camera is a must for conquering this game and its oodles of platforming. Other issues the game has are some bosses that have pretty poorly signposted weaknesses, and the difficulty curve is good but starts pretty darn high as you get used to the controls. It's a game you really need to get into the spirit of trying to beat, as it's not gonna hold your hand through things as you learn the ropes of how best to approach platforming and combat with the somewhat particular way Maximo controls.

The presentation is really nice. Enemies and allies alike have very distinct designs to them, and the homages in especially Maximo's design to original Ghouls 'n' Ghosts aesthetics are really fun. The music is also excellent, with tons of new takes on old Ghouls 'n' Ghosts tracks populating each world.


Verdict: Recommended. The awkward way that the game controls, particularly its camera, will likely turn off a fair few people, but if you're a 3D action platformer fan, there's a lot to enjoy with Maximo. It may have its fair share of problems, but its very deliberate design makes it work well within the confines of its own game, and it's well worth checking out~.
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prfsnl_gmr
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Re: Games Beaten 2021

by prfsnl_gmr Mon Sep 13, 2021 6:36 am

Great reviews, everyone. I read all of these and really enjoy them.

…..

First 40
1. Horace (Switch)
2. Ghostrunner (Switch)
3. Mickey’s Adventure in Numberland (NES)
4. Mickey’s Safari in Letterland (NES)
5. Castle of Illusion starring Mickey Mouse (Genesis)
6. The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess Picross (3DS)
7. World of Illusion starring Mickey & Donald (Genesis)
8. Castle of Illusion starring Mickey Mouse (Game Gear)
9. Land of Illusion starring Mickey Mouse (Game Gear)
10. Legend of Illusion starring Mickey Mouse (Game Gear)
11. Portal 2 [co-op] (PS3)
12. Operencia: The Stolen Sun (Switch)
13. The Knight of Queen (Switch)
14. Q.U.B.E. - Director’s Cut (PS3)
15. What the Golf?! (Switch)
16. Prune (iOS)
17. Kenshō (iOS)
18. For the Frog the Bell Tolls (GameBoy)
19. Holedown (iOS)
20. King’s Field (PS1)
21. My Friend Pedro (Switch)
22. MO: Astray (Switch)
23. EQI (Switch)
24. Foxyland (Switch)
25. Carrion (Switch)
26. QUBE 2 (Switch)
27. Aaero (Switch)
28. Portal 2 (PS3)
29. Alwa’s Awakening (Switch)
30. Alwa’s Legacy (Switch)
31. Mega Man 11 (Switch)
32. Superliminal (Switch)
33. Shantae & The Seven Sirens (Switch)
34. Halo 3 (360)
35. Legacy of the Wizard (NES)
36. Robo Warrior (NES)
37. Blaster Master Boy (GB)
38. Mario vs. Donkey Kong: Tipping Stars (3DS)
39. Donkey Kong Land (GB)
40. Mario & Donkey Kong: Minis on the Move (3DS)

41. Streets of Rage 4 (Switch)
42. Steamworld Dig 2 (3DS)
43. Mega Man: The Wily Wars (Genesis)
44. Streets of Rage (Game Gear)
45. Streets of Rage (Master System)
46. Streets of Rage 2 (Game Gear)
47. Streets of Rage II (Master System)
48. Ninja Gaiden (PC Engine)
49. Ninja Gaiden II (DOS)
50. Ninja Gaiden III (Lynx)
51. Ninja Gaiden Trilogy (SNES)
52. Kung Fu Master (Arcade)
53. Kung Fu Master (7800)


I played some more ports, and I’ll post detailed impressions in the TR thread!
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Ziggy587
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Re: Games Beaten 2021

by Ziggy587 Mon Sep 13, 2021 8:19 am

So I don't beat many new games each year, and when I do I almost always forget to update my Backloggery or post my experience here. But I just beat a game for the first time, and it's a sort of milestone for me, so I figured I better post about it.

Image

Air Zonk (TG16)

The reason this is a milestone for me is because it's the first shoot 'em up that I ever beat. For most of my gaming career, I never really cared for shmups. Something about one hit deaths and bullet hell just annoyed me. But a few years ago I got myself a PC Engine, then a Super SD System 3. So I had access to the entire PCE/TG16 card and CD library. And as I'm sure many of you are aware, the PCE has lots of shmups on it.

So I eventually gave Air Zonk a try, and I don't know, something about it just clicked with me. I've been playing more and more of it over the last couple of years, but it also got me interested in other shmups. And now all of a sudden I find myself loving shmups! It's kind of amazing, having played video games for this long but pretty much skipping this entire genre completely, now all of a sudden I have this huge flood of new games to try. It's almost overwhelming. I'm sure that most of us are at a point with retro games where you've pretty much tried everything, and finding new gems that you really click with are far and few in between. So all of a sudden having countless new awesome games to try, it feels like a video game renaissance to me LOL. I may post about this as it's own topic, but I figured I'd mention it here for now.

Anyway, circling back to Air Zonk... There's something about this game that I just love. I guess it's more of a cute 'em up, which I'm usually not really a fan of, but Air Zonk is not overly cute. Yes, it has bright and colorful graphics, but in an awesome way. It has that 90's 'tude (attitude) thing going on, but not in a way that feels lame or obnoxious. So aesthetically it ends up being pretty awesome, with really nice graphics to appreciate. I love the sprites, and the large boss sprites are crazy. I also love the sound and music. The music is punchy and catchy, in a Sonic 2 or 3 kind of way. I love the PCE sound chip, by the way. And as for the gameplay, I guess it's a great beginner shmup. It's really not hard at all on the easy difficulty. Easy enough that it became the first shmup I ever beat. Some shmups are very hard, and I end up feeling really tense when I play them. But there's something about Air Zonk that makes it more relaxing to play.
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My Sale Thread - I am selling around three quarters of my video game collection as well as some other odds and ends!
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marurun
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Re: Games Beaten 2021

by marurun Mon Sep 13, 2021 9:40 am

Marurun vs Games 2021 edition!
  1. Trials of Mana (Switch)
  2. Outer Worlds (Switch)
  3. Code of Princess: EX (Switch)
  4. Dragon Quest Heroes: Rocket Slime (DS)
  5. Dragon Warrior III (Gameboy Color)
  6. Bloodstained: Ritual of the Night - New Game+ (Switch)
  7. Scott Pilgrim vs. The World™: The Game – Complete Edition (Switch)
  8. Castlevania: Symphony of the Night (PS1 JPN version with translation patch)
  9. Night Slashers (Arcade, via Switch)

Night Slashers (Arcade, via Switch)

I had a buddy pay me a visit at the end of July (this review is overdue because I forgot about it). One of the things we did is sit down to play Night Slashers. Others have reviewed this already and given it the props it's due, so I won't be as detailed. This is a pretty great arcade brawler. It's got great animation, some fun sound effects, cheesy voice work, and is even better 2-player than 1-player.

Once you insert your coin you choose from a tall, blonde cyborg male, a dark-haired, male Western occultist, and a lithe female martial artist and Eastern spiritualist. Each character has a pretty good move set, including a charge attack. In 2-player mode you also have moves you can do with the other player that do pretty good damage, and some bosses can be dominated, if not actually locked-down, by two players playing intelligently (or getting stupid lucky). There are so many fun ways for zombies and monsters to die, it's great.

We did credit feed a little bit, but if we were in an arcade we wouldn't have gone broke tearing through the game. I feel like the game was, on the whole, a pretty good balance of eye candy and challenge. Very recommended for 2-player fun.
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