Games Beaten 2022

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prfsnl_gmr
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Re: Games Beaten 2022

Post by prfsnl_gmr »

First 20
1. Space Warrior (Switch)
2. Itta (Switch)
3. Shaq Fu: A Legend Reborn (Switch)
4. Mask of Mists (Switch)
5. Metagal (Switch)
6. Foxyland 2 (Switch)
7. Submerged (Switch)
8. Back to Bed (Switch)
9. Thoth (Switch)
10. 140 (Switch)
11. Infinite: Beyond the Mind (Switch)
12. Ninja Striker (Switch)
13. Kid Tripp (Switch)
14. Miles & Kilo (Switch)
15. Neon Junctions (Switch)
16. Golf Zero (Switch)
17. 198X (Switch)
18. Macbat 64 (Switch)
19. Kiwi 64 (Switch)
20. Toree 3D (Switch)

21. Toree 2 (Switch)
22. #RaceDieRun (Switch)
23. Micetopia (Switch)
24. Tomena Sanner (Wii)
25. Contra ReBirth (Wii)
26. Unstrong Legacy (Switch)
27. Quarantine Circular (Switch)
28. Infernax (Switch)
29. Cosmos Bit (Switch)
30. Ape Out (Switch)

Ape Out is a very, very Devolver Digital game. That is, it is good, not great, but very, very cool. In it, you play as a great ape escaping from captivity. The game is played from an overhead perspective, and your ape can run, in addition to running, can grab those trying to kill or recapture her. Once captured, the ape can hold the person like a human shield, or throw them away violently. The goal is, simply, to escape by any means necessary, and there’s some depth to the gameplay (e.g., knowing when to run, when to take cover, when to attack, etc.). The not-entirely-procedurally-generated levels keep the game fresh, and the arcade-y gameplay never wears out it welcome.

The graphics are highly stylized, employing a hand-drawn, colored-pencil-on-paper aesthetic. (The Gunman Clive games employ a similar effect.) The game also relies heavily on bright colors, and despite its simplicity, the game is a pleasure to behold from start to finish.

The soundtrack, however, is the real star. Each set of levels is presented as an album, and the game even uses a short loading screen to switch from “side 1” to “side 2” halfway through each section. Better, each album is a free jazz drumming album, and your actions in the game influence the soundtrack. Your footsteps might be reflected with light taps; gunshots might be drum beats: while slamming one of your captors against a wall results in a cymbal clash. This works extremely well, resulting in a soundtrack that tracks changes in gameplay tempo perfectly, and is just so, so cool. (A great article on the game’s stellar soundtrack is available at: https://www.game-grooves.com/blog/ape-out-jazz.)

Highly Recommended for the soundtrack, at the very least.
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Nemoide
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Re: Games Beaten 2022

Post by Nemoide »

THE LIST:
1. Diddy Kong Racing (N64)
2. Resident Evil 4 (Gamecube)
3. Freedom Planet (Switch)
4. Aleste (PS4)
5. Gunpey DS (DS)
6. GG Aleste (PS4)
7. Dr. Mario (GB)
8. Motor Toon Grand Prix (PS1)
9. PaRappa the Rapper (PS1)
10. GG Aleste II (PS4)
11. Power Strike II (PS4)
12. Rusty's Real Deal Baseball (3DS)
13. GG Aleste 3 (PS4)
14. Darius (PS4)
15. Darius: Extra Version (Genesis)
16. Cave Noire (Game Boy)
17. Mary-Kate & Ashley: Get a Clue! (Game Boy Color)
18. Sakura Wars (Saturn)


18. Sakura Wars (Saturn) - One of my major gaming goals has been achieved! I got this game back when I was in high school but always struggled with the language barrier. I'd try playing with a printed out translation guide, but it was tedious. I tried after taking some Japanese classes in college, but still wasn't proficient enough to get it. But then in late 2019 a translation patch appeared! And last year it was improved into a final version, so at long last I was able to play through the game naturally.
If you're not familiar with the game, it's half-dating sim/visual novel, half-turn-based-strategy combat. Back in the day it was held up as a prime example of "OMG Japanese wackiness" but if you're an anime fan whose played some Japanese adventure games, there's not going to be anything too wild. The game is structured like an anime series, there's an opening theme song that starts every time you boot up the game, and the game itself is broken into episodes that have an eyecatch screen (which allows you to save) that further divides the game into sections that vary between visual novel-style gameplay and the tactical combat. There's even a "next episode preview" at the end of each episode which is a very nice touch. The setting is a fictionalized steampunk Taisho-era Japan, which helps the game stand out among other anime-style games and the story is a fairly standard tokusatsu-style "supernatural bad guys want to take over the country" story where there's a different main baddie for each fight/episode. You play as a military officer who is assigned to be the commander of a new brigade but instead finds himself in charge of an all-female acting troupe. But the ladies are all secret soldiers with spiritual energy who pilot steam powered mechs against the supernatural enemies!

The visual novel part of the game felt very linear, but I think that's partly a testament to how good the game's flow is. I ended up getting paired with Sakura without even realizing it, just thinking the game naturally pushes you with her a lot (which it probably does). It's not a dating sim like Tokimeki Memorial, the romance aspect of the game really comes down to saying the right thing to make the various ladies like you more (occasionally playing minigames with them), and the more they like you, the more powerful they become in combat. It's pretty chaste, which is good since one of the girls is only 10 years old. The combat is good turn-based strategy where you move units around the battlefield and have them attack. You never have more units than the 6 main girls and yourself and death isn't permanent so it's a bit more lightweight than other strategy games but I still got a couple game overs. Those main girls are definitely a part of the main draw of the game, they're all different types voiced by big name voice actors, and if you like anime girls, you'll like at least one of them.

The game felt kind of simple, but was a very enjoyable time and I think it would be worth replaying and seeing what kind of differences you can have when you make different girls like you. I have no idea if it's possible to end up making everyone reject you and get a bad ending but I doubt it. I'm pretty sure there are a few minigames I may have missed out on by not going to the right places when you have the option to explore. I ended up with the Sakura ending which feels the most appropriate in my heart I think I like Kohran, the science girl, more. There's a bonus mode I unlocked after finishing the game that I've yet to try but after that I'll be taking a little break and will probably play some sequels (at least the 5th and 6th ones which were released in the US) after that. But I will likely revisit it down the line!

IDK, just some rough thoughts on the game. If you like 90s anime girls and Saturn games, it's a must-play, even if it isn't the most profound experience out there.
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MrPopo
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Re: Games Beaten 2022

Post by MrPopo »

Previous Years: 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021

1. Underworld Ascendant - PC
2. Castlevania: Harmony of Despair - PS3
3. Ni no Kuni - PS3
4. Operencia: The Stolen Sun - PC
5. RPM Racing - PC
6. Serious Sam: Siberian Mayhem - PC
7. Pokemon Legends: Arceus - Switch
8. Ni no Kuni II - PS4
9. Everspace - PC
10. PowerSlave Exhumed - PC
11. Horizon Forbidden West - PS5
12. Elden Ring - PS5
13. Shadow Warrior 3 - PC
14. Ghostrunner: Project_Hel - PC
15. Triangle Strategy - Switch
16. Tiny Tina's Wonderlands - PC
17. Nightmare Reaper - PC

Nightmare Reaper is a retro-styled boomer shooter with a few roguelite elements. It has a huge amount of content and serves as a master class in how to evolve your gameplay and level design over the course of the game, along with having an interesting, unobtrusive, and optional story to go with your blowing shit up action.

When you kick off the game you start in a room of a mental hospital. The door is locked, so you have no choice but to go to sleep once you're done poking around your space. And when you do, the nightmares start. You are thrust into a world where everything is out to kill you, so the only solution is to murder them first. You'll grab a variety of weapons with randomly rolled bonuses, as well as treasure to build up your gold supply. But when you reach the exit you can only keep one weapon of basic quality, so choose wisely, as that will be your only friend in the next level. If you die or finish you wake up in the hospital again, except now there are pages from the journal of your doctor, one page per stage. And as you proceed you'll notice that sometimes someone leaves your door open, giving you a chance to poke around the hospital a bit more.

The game consists of three episodes of nine stages each, with each stage having three parts. A stage consists of a single aesthetic and a pool of rooms; these rooms are then randomized and stitched together to form the level. This seems mostly to serve the purpose of keeping things fresh for the player when they die, as you aren't forced to deal with a potentially bad combination of enemies (especially important if you decided to keep a sub-par weapon from the last level). Wiping out all the enemies in a room has a chance to spawn a random event, which can be positive or negative. There are always a few secret rooms to find full of treasure, as well as a challenge room where you need to engage in some sort of traversal to get to the end with a guaranteed weapon and some treasure. Upon completing the stage you are ranked in three areas; enemies killed, treasure found, and secrets found. Doing well in each will give you a bonus multiplier on your collected gold. And that gold is important, as it fuels your skill tree.

Well, I should say the first of three "trees". The primary skill tree is set up like the world map of SMB3. Each "stage" is a skill to unlock, and costs a certain amount of gold. Upon selecting you engage in a small platforming level; reaching the end gives you the skill. You only get charged the gold upon finishing the stage, so you can always bail out midway through (and deaths restart the screen, so no pressure). The unlocks are things like increased ammo supply, increased health, increased value of treasure, as well as some mobility upgrades like a dash and a double jump. But there's two other trees. One is a Pokemon knockoff that has two different kinds of boosts. The first is a series of small boosts that cost currency that is only earned by finishing levels (fixed amount each level) and doing certain achievements. This makes it similar to the paragon system of Diablo 3, and the intent is you only really engage with it in new game plus modes. The other is pills you can collect, which can be equipped while you're in the hospital. These give you various boosts, but on the flip side it also means that the game will roll some negative effects in the stage. So you might take a pill for increased gold and increased number of beneficial events, but the game will then have you take increased damage and enemies move faster. So it's a risk reward system. Finally, the third tree is for engaging in the arena, which is unlocked as you go through the game. Finishing waves of enemies gives you currency for this tree, and the tree is you playing a shmup. You scan various points on a space map, which has you shmup your way through enemies, and then you get the results; it might be a gate to a higher area, a pirate encounter for generating a decent amount of currency for the tree, or a station to buy upgrades. There are upgrades for the shmup mode and upgrades for you. Some of the personal upgrades are various extra moves or passive benefits, but others give you a little helper who floats around and does stuff. One attacks enemies, while another helps you find secrets.

Wow, that was a big systems dump. The rest is quicker to go through. The game has extremely smooth and frantic shooter gameplay. As mentioned, enemies and objects can drop weapons, which come in three tiers. In general, a higher tier weapon is better than a lower tier weapon, but then they also have quality levels, which determine the number of mods they can roll. Uncommon is one, rare is two, and legendary is three positive with a chance for a negative. Getting a good set of mods can really help out, like getting elemental damage to help manage enemy crowds, or getting a chance to steal health. Initially you can only keep tier one weapons, but midway through the skill tree you can keep tier two weapons, and at the end you unlock both keeping two weapons at a time and tier three weapons. You'll want to try different things out to find what fits your play style, but also be careful. Some weapons might be really good for a boss and really bad against regular enemies, so you can put yourself in a bad situation by keeping the wrong weapon. In that situation you'll have to persevere and hope to get a good random drop to put you back on track.

The game starts off fairly simple in terms of level design, but episode two adds a grapple hook and a lot more verticality, while episode three improves the grapple hook and introduces level geometry that consists of islands floating in a death plane. You can do some really fancy stuff with the grapple at this point. The various interactibles also increase in complexity as you move forward. But fortunately, the game is good about highlighting things needed for level progression and leaving the ones that just unlock secrets unadorned.

Overall it has a fantastic balance to the gameplay and is super satisfying to play. As mentioned, there is a ton of content available, and that's before you talk about the optional stuff like the arenas and NG+ (which keeps upgrades but amps up enemies to match). If you're a fan of the genre I can't recommend this one enough.
Blizzard Entertainment Software Developer - All comments and views are my own and not representative of the company.
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MrPopo
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Re: Games Beaten 2022

Post by MrPopo »

Previous Years: 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021

1. Underworld Ascendant - PC
2. Castlevania: Harmony of Despair - PS3
3. Ni no Kuni - PS3
4. Operencia: The Stolen Sun - PC
5. RPM Racing - PC
6. Serious Sam: Siberian Mayhem - PC
7. Pokemon Legends: Arceus - Switch
8. Ni no Kuni II - PS4
9. Everspace - PC
10. PowerSlave Exhumed - PC
11. Horizon Forbidden West - PS5
12. Elden Ring - PS5
13. Shadow Warrior 3 - PC
14. Ghostrunner: Project_Hel - PC
15. Triangle Strategy - Switch
16. Tiny Tina's Wonderlands - PC
17. Nightmare Reaper - PC
18. Kur - PC

Kur is another indie boomer shooter, but unlike Nightmare Reaper it is an extremely amateur effort. It came out prior to Tiny Tina's Wonderlands, but I shifted from Kur to that because Kur is flat out a bad game. And not only bad, but majorly buggy. You would think a game coming out of Early Access would at least be reasonably polished from major, obvious bugs, but that isn't the case here.

The game tries to tell a story, but does a really poor job of it. It starts with you being hired to stop a rogue engineer who is trying to subvert the AI of a facility on Mars, and for this period the game is reasonably solid in terms of high level structure. Then after stopping the engineer you get sucked into a weird alternate dimension, called Kur. There's no explanation of what's going on, and you get tossed out by some weird voice and end up on a space station. You do ill defined things on the space station, get sucked into Kur again, get kicked out again, and apparently you did something terrible and Earth is fucked? So you escape to Earth, meet up with survivors, and try to stop the engineer (who you didn't actually stop?) once and for all. And after that there is one final Kur level.

The game has one key gimmick, which is that you have a Duke Nukem style mighty foot that can be used at any time, but this one can propel you with the force of a rocket jump. Aim at the floor, jump and kick? You go flying up. Aim at a wall in midair? You wallkick to get more height and some backwards movement. Enemy with a shield? Kick it off (but stay tuned for the caveats). It's a decently implemented mechanic, and worthy of a much better game.

See, the fundamental problem, aside from the actual bugs, is that the devs really don't understand what makes a shooter feel good. Let's start with the enemies. The common ranged enemy fires a slow projectile, just like a Doom Imp. But unlike basically every good FPS, this game has those enemies be inaccurate. So you frequently end up dodging into its shots. See, a fundamental rule of a good FPS is that hitscan enemies have a random miss chance so they don't annihilate you, while slow projectiles fire straight at you so you can dodge. Another problem is the implementation of melee. While your kick has a windup, enemy melee is active the moment the animation starts, and the hitbox does not seem to follow the weapon. So you will take a LOT of cheap melee damage if you let anything get close. Another issue is the weapons. And there's two problems here. The first is weapons must be purchased using currency earned from beating levels, but that currency is also used for ammo and health. The game is extremely stingy with ammo other than your pistols. But the game doesn't label any of the guns in the buy interface, so you don't really know what you're getting (it's a lot of chunky futuristic models). And the guns have a wide variability in usefulness. I found there was really only two guns that did effective damage. And the ones that didn't do good damage ALSO had extremely low ammo counts. It just all felt really bad to use, and that's a death sentence for an FPS. And a final thing to point out regarding the gameplay is the level design. The levels have very uneven lengths and complexities to them, and several of the complex levels have a lot of that complexity end up optional; one level I beat without finding two of the colored keys because apparently that was all optional. It makes the level design feel haphazard.

But the worst part was the bugs. I encountered AI breaks, where enemies just stopped reacting, as well as a bug with loaded saves where crates don't even spawn pistol ammo anymore. One stage had a bugged spawning routine when you loaded a save, so you always started at the beginning of the level. Fortunately, it turned out that you could compensate by jumping off the cliff; this was the second Kur level and it has a "if you fall off we respawn you somewhere close to where you are supposed to be" so I could zip further in the level. And finally, the second to last level doesn't end properly; a bug in the routine that pops up the end level dialog doesn't actually render it, and so you can't click the button to go next level. It puts you in a bad state if you escape to menu and then clear the menu. So it's not actually possible to get to the last level. So technically, I didn't beat the game, because as it stands it is unbeatable. The devs went radio silent right after launch, so I don't expect it ever to be fixed.

One final thing to point out. Many indie FPS games take a deliberate retro aesthetic. Nightmare Reaper was 2D art and chunky block-based walls, while Dusk did a low poly Quake 1 style. But in both cases you can still see all the care put into the graphics to get the most from the aesthetic. Here it's low poly because they just didn't have a decent artist. You can tell the difference. Skip this one, it's not worth your time.
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prfsnl_gmr
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Re: Games Beaten 2022

Post by prfsnl_gmr »

First 20
1. Space Warrior (Switch)
2. Itta (Switch)
3. Shaq Fu: A Legend Reborn (Switch)
4. Mask of Mists (Switch)
5. Metagal (Switch)
6. Foxyland 2 (Switch)
7. Submerged (Switch)
8. Back to Bed (Switch)
9. Thoth (Switch)
10. 140 (Switch)
11. Infinite: Beyond the Mind (Switch)
12. Ninja Striker (Switch)
13. Kid Tripp (Switch)
14. Miles & Kilo (Switch)
15. Neon Junctions (Switch)
16. Golf Zero (Switch)
17. 198X (Switch)
18. Macbat 64 (Switch)
19. Kiwi 64 (Switch)
20. Toree 3D (Switch)

21. Toree 2 (Switch)
22. #RaceDieRun (Switch)
23. Micetopia (Switch)
24. Tomena Sanner (Wii)
25. Contra ReBirth (Wii)
26. Unstrong Legacy (Switch)
27. Quarantine Circular (Switch)
28. Infernax (Switch)
29. Cosmos Bit (Switch)
30. Ape Out (Switch)
31. Return of the Double Dragon (Super Famicom)

Return of the Double Dragon is, basically, a slightly remixed version of Super Double Dragon. It keeps a lot of the original game’s deep combat system, and it keeps some of the original game’s flaws (i.e., no plotting, slow character movement, etc.). It jettisons the original’s difficulty, however, and it loses all of the crippling slowdown. It also rearranges the music and enemy placement.

If you’ve played Super Double Dragon, you’ll know what to expect with Return of the Double Dragon (i.e., a slow-paced beat’em ip that leaned hard into complicated control schemes when other games in the genre were migrating toward a single “attack” button). The smoother gameplay and laxer difficulty make Return of the Double Dragon a lot more approachable than Super Double Dragon, however, and ultimately the better game. Recommended.
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elricorico
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Re: Games Beaten 2022

Post by elricorico »

1. Pokémon Brilliant Diamond (NS)
2. Metal Slug 3 (XBO)
3. Wii Sports (Wii)
4. Castle of Illusion starring Mickey Mouse (GEN)
5. Arc the Lad (PS)
6. Rayman Origins (PC)
7. Brothers: A Tale of Two Sons (PC)
8. Final Fantasy IX (NS)

9. Kirby's Return to Dream Land (Wii)


This morning I played the last couple of levels and the end bosses in Kirby's Return to Dream Land. This was one of the later additions to my Wii collection. I started playing this game I think last fall, attempting to get my family to play it with me in multiplayer. My youngest daughter stuck with me for a few levels, but it never really caught their attention and I ended up chipping away at it on my own over time.

This game seems to be fairly traditional as far as Kirby games go - mostly focused on using copy abilities, 2D side scrolling/platforming, easy and forgiving gameplay and the ability to just float your way through much of the game if you so desire. Bright and colourful, upbeat music and a light story. Family friendly and classic Nintendo in its presentation.

Mostly I enjoyed this, but I found that it had a strange way of allowing you to play poorly and not really get good, because so much of the game is so easy. Then jarringly a collectable would require a little bit of skill and it felt like the structure of the game hadn't challenged you enough to prepare you for it. It really felt like for 90% of the game you didn't have to "get good", you didn't even really have to "get ok" at the game. Maybe the last 10% of the game had some more consistent challenge(still never really "hard"), so it started to feel like I actually learned more about moving Kirby well in the late levels rather than a gradual learning curve.

Altogether I had a good time with the game, but I don't see myself putting much time into the Extra quest or other added content, nor am I likely to do much backtracking for collectibles I missed while playing through. If you like Kirby this probably won't disappoint, but I don't see this game really wowing anyone. If I was prone to giving scores it feels like a 7/10 to me.
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Green_Warrior
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Re: Games Beaten 2022

Post by Green_Warrior »

1. Sonic Adventure 2 Battle (GCN)

I have beaten this game before, but this time decided to 100% it. I piggybacked off of my oldest save file and man did it take a lot of effort. Sega's arcade roots were still going strong back then. Lots of trial and error, unfair deaths etc, but I got there. 180 emblems, and the secret unlockable is Green Hill Zone remade in 3D. Back in 2001, that must have been the coolest unlockable ever to a Sonic fan. Today, it's Green Hill Zone for the millionth time, but I still enjoyed my victory lap. :mrgreen:

What I took from doing all of the alternate missions was a new appreciation for the non-Sonic levels. For a long time, I had been in the "Only Sonic levels, Shadow levels, and raising Chao were good in SA2." camp - I still feel that these are the main hooks of the game, but the treasure hunting realistically only gets a bad rap due to the final levels of Knuckles and Rouge being way too large. Most treasure hunting stages you can wander around (Fun fact, Knuckles and Rouge move faster than Sonic and Shadow in this game lol) until the radar picks up on what you need and you get a high score for not using hints. The mech levels are also better than I remember. When I first played this game at age 12, I mashed the B button to fire homing attacks as fast as possible. What I hadn't realized back then was that locking on to as many targets at once as possible (Up to 20!) nets you a higher score and the game plays with that challenge if you want high ranks in all of the mech levels.

Yeah, the lips aren't synced to the dialogue, and yeah you are still constantly fighting the camera, but I don't know. To me, Sonic Adventure 2 holds up. I'm confident in saying that it has more content than any other Sonic game out there. Sonic himself has never moved so well in 3D as he did in this title and the first Adventure game. I would love it if Sonic Team tried to replicate his movement and physics from this game for a future release.
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Nemoide
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Re: Games Beaten 2022

Post by Nemoide »

You're making me want to replay SA2. I'm definitely in the "Sonic/Shadow/Chao Raising are the only good parts" camp but while I've replayed SA1 multiple times, I don't think I've ever really revisited SA2 from start to finish. I definitely didn't come anywhere close to getting all the emblems!

THE LIST:
1. Diddy Kong Racing (N64)
2. Resident Evil 4 (Gamecube)
3. Freedom Planet (Switch)
4. Aleste (PS4)
5. Gunpey DS (DS)
6. GG Aleste (PS4)
7. Dr. Mario (GB)
8. Motor Toon Grand Prix (PS1)
9. PaRappa the Rapper (PS1)
10. GG Aleste II (PS4)
11. Power Strike II (PS4)
12. Rusty's Real Deal Baseball (3DS)
13. GG Aleste 3 (PS4)
14. Darius (PS4)
15. Darius: Extra Version (Genesis)
16. Cave Noire (Game Boy)
17. Mary-Kate & Ashley: Get a Clue! (Game Boy Color)
18. Sakura Wars (Saturn)
19. Pretty Girls Panic! (PS4)


19. Pretty Girls Panic! (PS4) - Ever play Gals Panic SS for Saturn? That's the game this one rips off! It's pretty much just Qix with pictures of pretty anime girls. Even though the art for the anime girls felt substandard, I had a fun enough time with it to justify the couple dollars it cost. It starts of trivially simple but does get challenging by the end. I like Qix and I like anime girls, it delivered that! The enemies where all sea creatures, which was a fun theme, even though I think they're just licensed assets. And I was amused that it gives you a Platinum trophy halfway through the game!
Not a lot that can be said about it, it's pretty basic!
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Green_Warrior
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Re: Games Beaten 2022

Post by Green_Warrior »

Nemoide wrote:You're making me want to replay SA2. I'm definitely in the "Sonic/Shadow/Chao Raising are the only good parts" camp but while I've replayed SA1 multiple times, I don't think I've ever really revisited SA2 from start to finish. I definitely didn't come anywhere close to getting all the emblems!


Funny, it's the other way around for me! Once I get the Dreamcast hooked back up, I'm hoping to dive back in to SA1 because I definitely rushed through it the first time around. Seems to me that both Adventure games have much more to offer than what's on the surface.
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Note
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Re: Games Beaten 2022

Post by Note »

1. Star Soldier: Vanishing Earth (N64)
2. Street Fighter III: 3rd Strike (Arcade)*
3. Metal Slug 6 (PS2)
4. Time Crisis II (PS2)*

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5. Virtua Fighter 5: Final Showdown (360)

Recently I had seen some short clips of matches from Virtua Fighter 5: Ultimate Showdown posted on Twitter by an arcade and game store in my area. Which made me search out some longer form footage of online bi-weekly tournaments for Virtua Fighter 5: Ultimate Showdown. I ended up watching a tournament hosted by Team Spooky, and thought the game looked really fun. I had played the earlier Virtua Fighter games for Saturn, but never tried 3, 4, or 5. I don't have a PS4, but since the older version of the game is available on Xbox Live for 360, I figured I'd grab it and learn the basics.

In the footage I watched, I liked the character design of Goh, and picked that character for my playthrough. I went through the tutorials first to get a hang of the controls. I'm more used to the control scheme of Capcom fighters, so it took me a bit of time to get used to the control scheme and move set, but I started to get a hang of it after doing some of the basic tutorials available. I think the moves and combo inputs are pretty intuitive.

I think for the time of its release, the graphics are pretty impressive. However, there is a remastered version on PS4 titled Virtua Fighter 5: Ultimate Showdown, which is even crisper. The graphics for the background stages are particularly well done. I especially like the iteration of the level with the ocean and palm trees in the background, pretty stunning. I found the soundtrack to be a mixed bag, there are some songs that I enjoyed and get the player hyped and in the mood for this type of game, but there are other songs that I think are more on the mediocre side.

Gameplay wise, I found the first few matches in single player mode to be fairly easy, but after around the 4th match, the difficulty seems to ramp up a bit. From this point on, it took me more than one attempt to claim victory in each match, but eventually I was able to do so. I find the controls to be fairly responsive and the move set to be fairly easy to pick up on. I'm still learning the input and timing for certain moves and combinations, but I'm having fun doing so. I was even able to get down a 7 hit combo in training mode! I just need to now try to execute it in matches against the computer. Also, it's cool that some levels have a full wall around the fighting area, some are totally open, and some have a railing. It changes the gameplay a bit, and makes positioning in each stage important.

I'm considering getting a PS4 later in the year, and the remastered version of Virtua Fighter 5 would be one of the first titles I'd grab on it. I think I'd really enjoy playing this online against others, and I'd like to continue practicing and trying to get a bit better at the game. Overall, if you're looking for a different 3D fighter with a lot of style, fast paced play, and easy to pick-up controls, I think this is a great choice. I'd definitely recommend it!
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